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Sunday, 7 June 2009

From Today's Papers - 07 Jun

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Proposed defence pact with Ukraine irks Moscow
Russia’s concern
n Ukraine among world’s top 10 arms exporters n It specialises in producing tanks, planes, anti-aircraft and radar systems n Moscow sees a competitor in Ukraine that can cut into its market in India
Ajay Banerjee
Tribune News Service

New Delhi, June 6
The country’s oldest defence partner, Russia, is ‘seeing red’ over moves by India and Ukraine to forge a defence agreement. A formal draft of the pact has been exchanged with Ukraine, part of the erstwhile Soviet Union. “The matter is ‘red hot’ at the moment, a top defence ministry official confirmed while requesting anonymity.

In response Moscow has raised objections to India’s keenness to have a formal defence tieup with Ukraine, which is seeking a “deeper military relationship” with the South Asian nation. It probably sees a competitor in Ukraine that can potentially cut into its almost assured defence market in India, said a source.

Also the strategic partnership between Russia and Ukraine has not been very fruitful with the latter beginning to tilt towards NATO countries, much to Russia’s chagrin.

At present, Ukraine is among the world’s top ten arms exporters. After the breakup of the Soviet Union it inherited a defence industry producing tanks, planes, anti-aircraft and radar systems as well as technological backup. It also retained the capacities to build seaborne aircraft carriers as the manufacturing facilities were based in Kiev.

Also, the AN-12 and AN-32 series of transport planes used by the Indian Air Force are still serviced by Ukraine. The country also has the capacity to build the Mi series of helicopters as well as T-80 and T-90 tanks, both of which it has supplied to Pakistan during the past decade. At one stage, Ukraine, possibly under Indian pressure, even stopped supplying the equipment to Pakistan.

For Ukraine its growing might as an arms and equipment manufacturer is somehow linked to Russia. If it is successful in its aim of joining NATO, Moscow is likely to withhold the components Ukraine still needs to assemble its weapons. This a legacy from Soviet times, with the production process for weapons systems split between factories in both countries.

Manufacturing a missile, for example, would require sourcing components from Russia.

Last year in June Moscow said it would severe all defence industry ties with Ukraine should the latter join NATO. Russia is paranoid over NATO extending its reach in countries geographically closer to it like Georgia, Turkey or any of the erstwhile Soviet ‘republics’ like Ukraine.

The Russians have been warning India about the “pitfalls” of entering such a defence agreement with Ukraine. The sources said India has tried to assuage Moscow’s sentiments but there is little scope of a breakthrough.

Meanwhile, there has been no movement on the proposed defence pacts by India with Spain and Sweden. In Europe India already has such agreements with Britain, France, Italy and Germany.

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/20090607/main2.htm

Pak ‘used’ US aid to build army

Washington, June 6
Pakistan has misused a substantial amount of military aid from the US meant to fight terrorism to build up its army with modern weapons and equipment for a conventional warfare against India, Pentagon documents have revealed.

All this was done with the knowledge of the then Bush administration, which not only provided $1.9 billion in Foreign Military Financing (FMF), but also signed agreements with Pakistan for military sales worth nearly $5 billion during the period, the documents accessed showed.

The Pentagon documents also revealed that a major post-9/11 American defence supply to Pakistan under FMF had nothing to do with its fight against terrorism.

While the Taliban and Al-Qaida gained ground in the tribal areas of Pakistan bordering Afghanistan, Islamabad bought eight P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft and their refurbishment worth $474 million. It also placed orders for 5,250 TOW anti-armour missiles worth $186 million. 2,007 of these have already been delivered and the rest are in the process of being supplied.

Besides buying more than 5,600 military radio sets worth $163 million, Pakistan bought six AN/TPS-77 surveillance radars worth $100 million and six C-130E transport aircraft and their refurbishment worth $76 million.

Under the Excess Defence Articles (EDA), it was granted 20 AH-1F Cobra attack helicopters, which were then refurbished, according to the Pentagon documents.

Pakistan also used a substantial chunk of America’s FMF to purchase up to 60 mid-life update kits for F-16 A/B combat aircraft valued at $891 million. Of this, it paid $477 million from the FMF funds given by the United States.

Similarly, of the $87 million worth order for 115 M-109 self-propelled howitzers, it paid $53 million from FMF. And all this happened while Pakistan’s economic situation deteriorated.

Islamabad also paid a whopping $1.43 billion to the US to purchase 18 new F-16 combat aircraft and another $629 million for F-16 armaments.

Prominent among these are 500 AMRAAM air-to-air missiles; 1,450 2,000-pound bombs; 500 JDAM tail kits for gravity bombs and 1,600 Enhanced Paveway laser-guided kits, also for gravity bombs. F-16 has not been delivered to date.

Pakistan also paid $298 million for 100 Harpoon anti-ship missiles; $95 million for 500 sidewinder air-to-air missiles and $80 million for six Phalanx close-in-naval guns.

While the Pentagon notified Congress on the possible transfer to Pakistan of three P-3B aircraft as EDA grants that would be modified to carry the E-2C Hawkeye air-borne early warning suite in a deal worth up to $855 million, this effort has not progressed beyond the notification stage.

Major EDA grants since 2001 include 14 F-16A/B combat aircraft and 39 T-37 military trainer jets.

Under Coalition Support Funds - part of the Pentagon budget - Pakistan has received 26 Bell 412 utility helicopters, along with related parts and maintenance, valued at $235 million.

Finally, under 1206 and Frontier Corps Authorities, the United States has provided Pakistan with helicopter spare parts, night vision goggles, radios, body armour, helmets, first aid kits, litters and other individual soldier equipment — PTI

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/20090607/main3.htm

Pakistani Army Set for Long Haul in Northwest: Editorial

Islamabad
The Pakistani army might have the Taliban on the run in the country's restive northwest but it is in for a long haul as the true battle will begin once peace is restored, an editorial in a leading English daily said Saturday.

Another editorial maintained that the "damage done by past blunders can be rectified to some extent if the tasks at hand are performed with diligence and planning".

"The army is going to have to stay in the area if any sort of peace is to be guaranteed, and having taken the land it now has to hold it. A premature return to barracks is just what we do not need," The News said in an editorial headlined "Too soon to say?"

The headline was in reaction to army chief Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani's statement Thursday that the "tide is turning" in favor of the security forces in the Swat district of the North West Frontier Province (NWFP), which is now the focus of the anti-Taliban operations launched April 26.

The News noted that the civil administration of Swat - and elsewhere - "is going to take months to reconstitute itself and will need protection while it does so".

This apart, up to three million "vulnerable people" displaced by the fighting in Swat and two other NWFP districts "are going to want to go home - they need protecting while they do that and protection in the period after their return if we are not to see ourselves faced with having to do the job all over again in six months or a year", the editorial maintained.

Noting that civilian officials were talking of a need for an army presence of six months to a year, "which sounds a not-unreasonable time frame", the editorial said: "The military phase of this operation is but a part of the whole, and that if the Taliban are to be truly defeated it will only be after the construction of an alternative narrative, a narrative that negates that of extremism.

"Our army has fought bravely and well, but we would not want to have to send them to war again because we made the mistake of counting our chickens before they were hatched," The News maintained.

Dawn wrote in similar vein, saying: "The damage done by past blunders can be rectified to some extent if the tasks at hand are performed with diligence and planning."

The reference was to a statement from the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP) that Wednesday maintained that "the intensity of a full-fledged military operation could have been avoided if the militants had been confronted, discouraged, deported and captured earlier".

The armed forces had gone into action after the Taliban reneged on a controversial peace deal with the NWFP government and instead moved south from their Swat headquarters and instead occupied Buner, which is just 100 km from Islamabad.

The operations had begun in Lower Dir, the home district of Taliban-backed radical cleric Sufi Muhammad who had brokered the peace deal and who is the father-in-law of Swat Taliban commander Maulana Fazlullah, and later spread to Buner and Swat.

The military says a little over 1,300 militants have so far been killed in the operations, while the security forces have lost some 85 personnel.

http://news.boloji.com/2009/06/30661.htm

Pak used aid for warfare against India: US documents

Press Trust of India, Saturday June 6, 2009, Washington

Pakistan has used a substantial amount of military aid from the US meant to fight terrorism to build up its army with modern weapons and equipment for a conventional warfare against India, the Pentagon documents have revealed.

All this was done with the knowledge of the then Bush Administration, which not only provided $1.9 billion in Foreign Military Financing (FMF) but also signed agreements with Pakistan for military sales worth nearly $5 billion during the period, showed the documents.

The Pentagon documents also revealed that a major post-9/11 American defence supply to Pakistan under FMF had nothing to do with its fight against terrorism.

While the Taliban and Al-Qaida gained ground in the tribal areas of Pakistan bordering Afghanistan, Islamabad bought eight P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft and their refurbishment worth $474 million. It also placed orders for 5,250 TOW anti-armour missiles worth $186 million. More than 2,000 of these have already been delivered and the rest are in the process of being supplied.

Besides buying more than 5,600 military radio sets worth $163 million, Pakistan bought six AN/TPS-77 surveillance radars worth $100 million and six C-130E transport aircraft and their refurbishment worth $76 million. Under the Excess Defence Articles (EDA), it was granted 20 AH-1F Cobra attack helicopters, which were then refurbished, according to the Pentagon documents.

Pakistan also used a substantial chunk of America's FMF to purchase up to 60 mid-life update kits for F-16 A/B combat aircraft valued at $891 million. Of this, it paid $477 million from the FMF funds given by the United States.

Similarly, of the $87 million worth order for 115 M-109 self-propelled howitzers, it paid $53 million from FMF. And all this happened while Pakistan's economic situation deteriorated.

Islamabad also paid a whopping $1.43 billion to the US to purchase 18 new F-16 combat aircraft and another $629 million for F-16 armaments.

Prominent among these are 500 AMRAAM air-to-air missiles; 1,450 2,000-pound bombs; 500 JDAM tail Kits for gravity bombs and 1,600 Enhanced Paveway laser-guided kits, also for gravity bombs. F-16 has not been delivered to date.

Pakistan also paid $298 million for 100 Harpoon anti-ship missiles; $95 million for 500 sidewinder air-to-air missiles and $80 million for six Phalanx close-in-naval guns.

While the Pentagon notified Congress on the possible transfer to Pakistan of three P-3B aircraft as EDA grants that would be modified to carry the E-2C Hawkeye air-borne early warning suite in a deal worth up to $855 million, this effort has not progressed beyond the notification stage.

Major EDA grants since 2001 include 14 F-16A/B combat aircraft and 39 T-37 military trainer jets.

Under Coalition Support Funds -- part of the Pentagon budget -- Pakistan has received 26 Bell 412 utility helicopters, along with related parts and maintenance, valued at $235 million.

Finally, under 1206 and Frontier Corps Authorities, the United States has provided Pakistan with helicopter spare parts, night vision goggles, radios, body armour, helmets, first aid kits, litters and other individual soldier equipment.

http://www.ndtv.com/news/world/pak_built_army_against_india_with_aid_pentagon.php

US reviews policy to allow Sikhs in army

Press Trust of India, Saturday June 6, 2009, Washington

Following an outcry from the Sikh community, the US defence department has decided to review its policy which prevents Sikhs from joining the country's armed forces.

On behalf of Defense Secretary Robert Gates, the Pentagon has informed an advocacy group Sikh Coalition that it was reviewing current regulations preventing a US Sikh national from serving the army on the ground that they wear turban.

"Although our current regulation establishes the standards of wear and appearance of the uniform, we understand the importance of reviewing the rationale behind our current policies when circumstances warrant," wrote Major General John R Hawkins, Director, Human Resources, Policy Directorate, Pentagon.

The senior leadership is aware of the concerns of the Sikh community, said the letter dated April 29, which was released to the media on Friday.

The Coalition, which had taken up the issue after two Sikh Americans challenged the regulation, has welcomed the Army's step.

"We believe that once the Army fully reviews the policy, it will agree that Sikh practices have in no way acted as an impediment to successful service in any military in the world," Amardeep Singh, executive director of Sikh Coalition, said in a statement.

On January 26 this year, the Coalition wrote to Gates regarding two Sikhs who were told to give up their religious practices in order to continue their services in the army.

Captain Kamaljit Singh Kalsi and Captain Tejdeep Singh Rattan were recruited as part of an Army program that pays for medical education in return for military service.

At the time of their enrollment, military recruiters assured both of them that their turbans and unshorn hair "would not be a problem."

Four years later, the army is now telling the two Sikhs that the recruiters' assurances were false and that they will have to forsake their religious practices.

http://www.ndtv.com/news/world/us_reviews_policy_to_allow_sikhs_in_army.php

UN chief urges war crimes probe in Sri Lanka

AP/PTI / United Nation June 6, 2009, 17:18 IST

The UN chief lent credence to the possibility of war crimes in Sri Lanka, saying an international investigation is needed to examine the military actions of the government and defeated Tamil Tiger rebels during the civil war.

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, at a closed-door briefing for Security Council members, called for a credible inquiry to be undertaken with international backing and full support from Sri Lanka's government.

He declined to elaborate on exactly how the inquiry should be done, but he urged an examination of what he said were serious allegations of violations of international humanitarian laws, according to diplomats and UN officials who attended.

"Any inquiry, to be meaningful, should be supported by the members of the United Nations, and also should be very impartial and objective," Ban told reporters yesterday at UN headquarters.

"I would like to ask the Sri Lankan government to recognise the international call for accountability and full transparency," he said. "And whenever and wherever there are credible allegations of violations of humanitarian law, there should be a proper investigation."

Sri Lanka has rejected either an international or joint investigation, saying civil war is a domestic issue.

http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/un-chief-urges-war-crimes-probe-in-sri-lanka/63939/on

US military aid to Pak used for defence capabilities
7 Jun 2009, 0032 hrs IST, ET Bureau

NEW DELHI: As India’s concerns grow on the US plans to increase military aid to Pakistan, Pentagon documents have revealed that a large amount of


military aid given earlier by Washington to fight terrorism was used by Islamabad to build up its defence capabilities, which were mainly targeted against India.

Aware of what was happening, the then Bush administration, according to an agency report, had given $1.9 billion in Foreign Military Financing (FMF) and signed agreements for military sales worth around $ 5 billion.

But the defence supply under Foreign Military Financing after the 9/11 attacks had little to do with fighting terror, according to the report.

The report comes at a time when New Delhi is planning to reiterate its concerns to Washington about increasing aid to Pakistan when US undersecretary of state William Burns visits India next week. New Delhi is only concerned about the money being diverted for other purposes.

This is not the first time that reports have emerged about Islamabad using US aid to arm itself against New Delhi. Yet another report had maintained that Pakistan has 60 nuclear warheads mainly targeted against India.

Pakistan, according to the report, bought a whole range of defence equipment ranging from defence equipment to defence aircraft and trainer jets over the years with US aid. This included eight P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft and their refurbishment worth $ 474 million.

Islamabad also placed orders for 5,250 TOW anti-armour missiles worth $186 million out of which 2,007 have been delivered and the rest are in the process of being supplied, the report said. The list of defence equipment is varied from military radio sets worth $163 million to surveillance radars worth $100 million.

The supply of equipment also includes air-to-air missiles, 2,000-pound bombs and kits for the gravity bombs. Out of a $87 million order for 115 M-109 self-propelled howitzers, Islamabad paid $53 million from Foreign Military Financing.
The report further said that under Coalition Support Funds, Islamabad had received 26 Bell 412 utility helicopters and other parts which were valued at $235 million.

The Coalition Support Funds is part of the Pentagon budget. Pakistan also paid $298 million for 100 Harpoon anti-ship missiles; $95 million for 500 sidewinder air-to-air missiles and $80 million for six Phalanx close-in-naval guns, according to the report.

With the Obama administration pushing for increased aid to Pakistan, Islamabad is in for a fresh injection of aid both non military and military and this has left India concerned. Sources said that the US is aware of India’s position on the matter.

At present, the US Congress is debating a bill that seeks to give Pakistan $ 7.5 billion in non-military aid over a period of five years.

New Delhi is keen to see stiff conditions being imposed on Islamabad so that the money is not diverted for warfare against India.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/PoliticsNation/US-aid-to-Pak-used-for-defence/articleshow/4625960.cms

'We want more private role in defence'


Saubhadro Chatterji / New Delhi June 07, 2009, 0:13 IST


The military must get its hardware in time, Mallipudi Mangapati Pallam Raju, minister of state for defence, tells SAUBHADRO CHATTERJI

The first UPA government created a separate department for the welfare of ex-servicemen. What are your plans on this front?
Rehabilitation and resettlement of ex-servicemen are priority areas for this government. We have already created a post of director general (resettlement). Every year, 50,000 to 60,000 soldiers retire. Most of these belong to the “people below officer rank” (PBOR) segment. We believe that these ex-servicemen, who have received army training for so many years, are an asset to the nation. They pick up a number of skills during their stint with the armed forces. The age is also on their side when they leave the forces. They are in their late 30s or early 40s. The government can’t do everything on its own. So, we have tied up with the private sector for their training, resettlement and placements.

What sort of a tie-up you are aiming at?
We have already entered into agreements with business bodies like Ficci, CII and Assocham for training and placements. We look forward to more such agreements in the coming days.

Which are the sectors where ex-servicemen are finding maximum employment?
Well, as you know, there is a huge demand for these trained personnel in private security services. Our ex-servicemen are doing a good job there. But we now find that there is demand from various industries for their mechanical skills. In the construction sector, the demand for skilled ex-servicemen is steadily rising.

As the retail trade starts to boom, it is becoming a major employer of ex-servicemen. Reliance Retail, for example, has employed a large number of ex-servicemen. We declared 2007 the year of the ex-servicemen to boost our resettlement plans for them. We find the private sector showing increasing interest in employing ex-servicemen.

Apart from Reliance Retail, Infosys is another big company that is employing a large number of ex-servicemen.

Jairam Ramesh, the minister in charge of environment, recently told us that he wanted to take the help of ex-servicemen for a large afforestation programme.
Yes, ex-servicemen can also contribute to the environment protection programme. Earlier, there was an eco-battalion in the Territorial Army. We can raise a similar group of ex-servicemen for environment. I think my senior colleague, Defence Minister AK Antony, held a meeting with Jairam Ramesh in this regard. Task forces will be raised for afforestation in places where we are building roads.

From the infrastructure point of view, the Border Roads Organisation (BRO) plays an important role. What is your road map for it?
We have 13 project groups, or set-ups, in the BRO to handle the tasks in different regions. Not only do we have our own projects, that is, the roads that are required by the defence ministry, we also get regular requests from state governments to take up their road projects.

The states of north eastern India and Jammu & Kashmir want us to execute many of their projects. But I felt the BRO was taking up too much responsibility. Now, we need to be more focused. We have to utilise our manpower and resources better.

Earlier, the BRO used to miss its targets, but now we are regularly meeting the targets. We want to improve this record.

What are the constraints you face in the BRO’s functioning?
Let me make it very clear, the budget is not at all a problem for the BRO. The allocation is made on the basis of our needs. But as I was telling you, in the North-East, our men and materials were spread over a large area. We need to change this and work in specific areas. Currently, we are executing the prime minister’s package for the North East, apart from GS (general study) roads and China Study Group roads. We have turned down a few projects from the states. We have to focus on modernisation of the BRO and get more equipment.

For the last two years, we have started quarterly meetings of the BRO board. Earlier, these meetings were not held for years.

But the biggest bottleneck is getting environmental clearances. It takes so long to get the clearances that we miss one or two seasons to work. You know, both in Jammu & Kashmir as well as in the North-East, there’s a limited period in a year during which we can work. The delay also results in high escalation of costs for our projects. Now, we have roped in the environment secretary as a member of the BRO board. We have changed our planning process too. Now, the planning is made much in advance.

Defence production is another area where we see a lot of delays.
Yes. But now our target is to get our capabilities in time for the armed forces. You see, if procurement is delayed, our armed forces suffer the most. The cost escalates and they are deprived of the hardware when they need it. Whether we get it from defence PSUs or from foreign companies is not a matter of much concern. We must get military hardware in time. At the same time, we are committed to increasing the private sector participation in defence production.

http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/%5Cwe-want-more-private-role-in-defence%5C/360248/

Defence ministry blacklists 7 firms on corruption charges

6 Jun 2009, 0253 hrs IST, TNN

NEW DELHI: With former Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) chairman Sudipto Ghosh being arrested by CBI recently in a major defence scandal, the defence ministry has blacklisted seven companies, including major ones from Israel, Singapore and Poland, named in the case.

Keen to curb the widespread murky wheeling and dealing in arms deals, defence minister A K Antony has directed that all acquisition cases and projects in the pipeline with the seven companies "be put on hold till further orders".

While the foreign firms are Israeli Military Industries (IMI), Singapore Technology, Media Architects (Singapore) and BVT Poland, the Indian ones are HYT Engineering, R K Machine Tools and T S Kishan and Company Pvt Ltd.

All the seven firms were named in the CBI FIR registered on May 17 against Ghosh, M S Sawhney, a Vasant Vihar-based defence dealer, Ramesh Nambiar, an additional general manager with Air India, and three middlemen, Ashish Bose, Pradeep Rana and Kanhai Lal Das.

IMI, incidentally, had inked a contract with OFB, worth around Rs 1,200 crore, to set up an ordnance complex of five plants at Nalanda in Bihar, in the run-up to the general elections in March.

The plants were to manufacture 155mm Bi-Modular Charge Systems (BMCS) and other propellant charges for heavy calibre artillery ammunition for Army's Bofors howitzers and other guns.

Singapore Technology, one of the biggest aerospace and land systems company in Asia, in turn, was a strong contender in tenders for 155mm artillery guns for Army.

While Media Architects is said to be supplying video-editing software to Indian armed forces, BVT Poland is said to be engaged in marine engineering and naval architecture.

As for the Indian companies, T S Kishan and Company apparently supplies spares and accessories for Army's T-72 and T-90S main-battle tanks, while Pune-based HYT Engineering provides some components of missiles produced within the country. Ludhiana-based R K Machine Tools, in turn, supplies spares for vehicles and machinery produced by Defence PSU Bharat Earth Movers Ltd.

"While CBI is yet to file the chargesheet, there is concrete evidence about money transfers to personal accounts of the persons named in the FIR. The defence ministry has sought a detailed list of equipment and material that these blacklisted companies provided to the armed forces. It is still awaited," said an official.

The blacklisting of the seven companies comes four years after the South African arms firm, Denel, was banned for allegedly paying Rs 20 crore as kickbacks in five contracts for supply of 700 anti-material rifles and ammunition as well as transfer of technology to OFB.

But, interestingly enough, Israeli Aerospace Industries and Rafael, named in the kickbacks case in the original Rs 1,160-crore Barak-I anti-missile defence system deal inked in 2000, have not been blacklisted on the ground that it would be "counter-productive" due to the several crucial defence projects underway with them.

The Nalanda project, on its part, has had a convoluted past. The project was first kicked off during George Fernandes' tenure as defence minister in the NDA regime, with the proposed factory complex at Rajgir in Nalanda located in his earlier Lok Sabha constituency.

Later, the NDA regime identified Denel for the Nalanda project. But after Denel's blacklisting, the construction of the Nalanda complex, on which an initial Rs 306 crore was spent, had come to a grinding halt.

The UPA government, after coming to office, later constituted an "expert committee" to review the entire project. Subsequently, a global tender was floated after the green signal from the "expert committee" and the Cabinet Committee on Security had approved IMI's participation in January this year.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/msid-4622346,prtpage-1.cms

Vice Admiral NK Verma designated as the next Chief of Naval Staff

June 6th, 2009 Posted by Frontier India Strategic and Defence

Published in Indian Navy News

The India government has decided to appoint Vice Admiral Nirmal Kumar Verma, PVSM,AVSM,ADC, presently Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief (FOC-in-C), Eastern Naval Command as the next Chief of the Naval Staff with effect from the afternoon of 31st August, 2009. The present Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Sureesh Mehta, PVSM, AVSM, ADC retires from service on that day.

Born on 14 November 1950, Vice Admiral Verma was commissioned on 1 July 1970 into the Executive Branch of Indian Navy.

admiral-nk-vermaDuring his long and distinguished service spanning nearly 39 years, he has served in a variety of Command, Staff and Instructional appointments. Vice Admiral Verma’s Sea Command includes Leander class Frigate “Udaigiri”, Guided Missile Destroyer “Ranvir” and the Aircraft Carrier “Viraat”. Before taking over as FOC-in-C, Eastern Naval Command, he was Vice Chief of the Naval Staff at the Naval Headquarters.

Vice Admiral Verma is an alumnus of Royal Naval Staff College, UK and Naval War College, USA. He has instructional experience at National Defence College as Senior Directing Staff and at Defence Services Staff College, Wellington. He also commanded the Naval Academy at Goa.

Vice Admiral Verma was decorated with Param Vishist Seva Medal (PVSM) and Ati Vishist Seva Medal(AVSM). He is one of the Honorary ADCs of the Supreme Commander. He is married to Mrs. Madhulika and the couple has two sons.

http://frontierindia.net/vice-admiral-nk-verma-designated-as-the-next-chief-of-naval-staff



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