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Wednesday, 7 October 2009

From Today's Papers - 07 Oct 09

Indian Express

Asian Age

The Pioneer

Telegraph India

Asian Age

Asian Age

Kashmir Times

Telegraph India

Asian Age

Asian Age

Asian Age

Telegraph India

Kashmir Times

Asian Age

The Pioneer

The Pioneer

The Pioneer

Times of India

Times of India

DNA India

DNA India

ISI orders 60 Taliban militants to enter India

NDTV Correspondent, Tuesday October 6, 2009, Srinagar

Sources say 60 Taliban militants are waiting to enter India. They are among 350 militants housed in camps in Pakistan-Occupied Kashmir.

The fighters have allegedly been told by Pakistan's ISI to enter India or face jail.

Extra vigil on the International border and Line of Control has been ordered. Intelligence sources say that the next 15 days are key for India to prevent the militants from entering the country.

http://www.ndtv.com/news/india/60_taliban_militants_trying_to_enter_india_sources.php

Grenade attack in Srinagar, 2 BSF jawans injured

NDTV Correspondent, Tuesday October 6, 2009, Srinagar

Two security personnel were injured when militants hurled a grenade at their vehicle at Lal Chowk, the heart of Srinagar, on Tuesday.

The militants lobbed the grenade at the vehicle, parked near the historic clock tower in Lal Chowk at around 2.30 pm.

The whole area was immediately sealed and a hunt launched to catch the militants involved in the attack.

Details are awaited.

http://www.ndtv.com/news/india/grenade_attack_in_srinagar_2_bsf_jawans_injured.php

Army capable of countering Chinese military threat: Kapoor

Press Trust of India, Tuesday October 6, 2009, New Delhi

Rubbishing the chances of a repeat of the 1962 Sino-Indian war which China won, Army Chief General Deepak Kapoor on Tuesday said the Army was "capable of defending" Indian territory and ward off any aggression.

"The Indian Army is capable of looking after and ensuring the defence of the country. It would take care of any aggression against Indian territory," General Kapoor said.

"The charter of the Army is to defend Indian territory at all costs. This talk of repeat of 1962 is totally incorrect and uncalled for," he said.

Stating that "offensive action" could not be part of any credible defensive posture, the Army chief added that his force was "sincere to ensure the defence of our country to the last of our blood."

The Army, Kapoor said, had the requisite capability to defend the Indian territory even if it means deployment of force multipliers.

http://www.ndtv.com/news/india/army_capable_of_countering_chinese_military_threat_kapoor.php

Eye feast in offing on IAF anniversary
Tribune News Service

New Delhi, October 6
The Indian Air Force will for the first time publically display its newest acquisition, an airborne early warning and control system (AWACS), during its 77th anniversary celebrations at Hindon, near the Capital, on October 8.

The AWACS, a modified IL-76 that has been fitted with a high- frequency radar, was part of the full rehearsal carried out today. Due to bad weather conditions in the National Capital Region, the IAF was forced to cut short its rehearsal as the frontline fighter jets —Sukhoi-30 and Mirage-2000 — could not take off.

During the rehearsal, the senior air staff officer (SASO) of the Western Air Command Air Marshal KS Karnik inspected the parade. On October 8, the AWACS will be escorted by two Sukhois. Among the choppers scheduled to be flown that day are the M-17, M-25 and Mi-35.

The IAF will also be flying its fighter jets —Jaguars, Mig-21, Mig-29, Mirage-2000 besides the Sukhoi-30. The IAF’s ‘Surya Kiran’ team on Kiran Mk-II trainer aircraft and the ‘Sarang’ team on their ALH Dhruv helicopters were part of the parade today.

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/20091007/nation.htm#8

Army can counter Chinese threat: Gen Kapoor

New Delhi, October 6
Rubbishing the chances of a repeat of the 1962 Sino-Indian war which China won, Army chief General Deepak Kapoor today said the Army was “capable of defending” the Indian territory and ward off any aggression.

“The Indian Army is capable of looking after and ensuring the defence of the country. It would take care of any aggression against the Indian territory,” General Kapoor said. “The charter of the Army is to defend the Indian territory at all costs. This talk of repeat of 1962 is totally incorrect and uncalled for,” he said.

Stating that “offensive action” could not be part of any credible defensive posture, the Army chief added that his force was “sincere to ensure the defence of our country to the last drop of our blood”.

The Army, Kapoor said, had the requisite capability to defend the Indian territory even if it means deployment of force multipliers. Strengthening and modernisation of the forces was a dynamic process, he said. “It is an ongoing process and modernisation of the Army is going on. The Chinese too are modernising the People’s Liberation Army. We need to build our capabilities to be able to meet the challenges whenever it appears,” he added.

On the incursions by Chinese military personnel on the Indian side of the Line of Actual Control (LAC) between the two countries, Kapoor said the transgressions by the PLA continued to be at the same level as last year.

“In 2009, so far, the numbers of transgressions have been almost exactly at the same level as during the corresponding period in 2008,” he alleged. — PTI

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/20091007/nation.htm#21

EDITORIAL: Where did the funds go?

As the Obama Administration focuses more on the social sectors of the Pakistani economy and separates its aid to Pakistan under the Kerry-Lugar Bill from assistance to the Pakistan Army, new information about how the old US funds were utilised by the Musharraf regime has come to light. The revelation is that the army was not given all the aid meant for increasing its capacity to fight terrorism, but that most of it was diverted by the Musharraf regime to prop up the civilian government.

A couple of retired generals have decided to speak out. General Mahmud Durrani (Retd), who was Pakistan’s ambassador to the US under General Musharraf, says: “It went to things like subsidies, which is why everything looked hunky-dory. The military was financing the war on terror out of its own budget.” And how was this made possible? By the fact that General Musharraf was both army chief and de facto “ruling” president of Pakistan.

According to a report, the additional shocking fact is that some sections of the army, faced with the terrorism of the Taliban, received nothing till 2007, the year when Musharraf’s era began to crumble under pressure from the mistakes the general-president made. In these lean years for the army, “helicopters critical to the battle were not available; the limited night-vision equipment was taken away every three months and returned three weeks later; and old equipment fell out of repair and training was lacking.”

There have been rumours about money getting “siphoned off” on Musharraf’s watch. Some US circles thought Pakistan’s military was more obsessed with India and spent what it got not on the war against domestic terrorism, but on its state of preparedness against India. But if, between 2002 and 2008, only $500 million of the $6.6 billion aid actually made it to the Pakistani military, what kind of defence against India was Pakistan able to secretly mount? On the other hand, the PPP leader President Asif Ali Zardari has been talking of the “misuse” of nearly $10 billion in American aid.

Pakistan doesn’t make public its defence budget. So one cannot track what happens to the money that goes into it. Such sectors as intelligence are kept away from public scrutiny although most of what the spooks do affects the civil sector and the economy. We know that General Musharraf “saved” the army some money by inducting a large number of serving officers into civilian jobs. Pakistan already pays its army’s pensions from the civilian budget, but the charge that wasteful subsidies were paid out of the money meant for the army needs investigation. The “circular” debt that General Musharraf’s regime left behind indicates how reckless his government was with the economy he never tired of discussing.

The Americans were willing to fund the Pakistan Army because in comparison with their own troops it was cheap. By 2008, the US paid Pakistan $8.6 billion for the military, and more than $12 billion in all. The army would send in the bills and the US would pay, barring some cases when delays took place till lack of trust began to prevail and the bills remained pending.

General Mahmud Durrani, whose thesis is that Pakistan has disadvantaged itself politically and economically by pursuing India-centric strategies, says money went into buying equipment better suited to fighting India in Afghanistan than to fighting terrorists. It bought armour-piercing TOW missiles, sophisticated surveillance equipment, air-to-air missiles, maritime patrol aircraft, anti-ship missiles and F-16 fighter aircraft. As a result, in 2007, Pakistan had only one working helicopter for use in FATA!

Pakistan was the largest recipient of US assistance under General Musharraf. It is about to receive even more of it under the Kerry-Lugar Bill. Because of what has happened in the past, there is a lack of trust between the donor and the recipient. Also, those who want to fight terrorism in Pakistan without American help — they actually believe Pakistan doesn’t need to fight terrorism — want the American assistance rejected. Until an inquiry is held — and the time for that will come later — we will not know what actually happened. Now is the time to back the army and do whatever it takes to increase its capacity to fight the terrorists. *

http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2009\10\07\story_7-10-2009_pg3_1

IAF will have to wait to ‘shoot back’ at Naxals
Ajay Banerjee
Tribune News Service

New Delhi, October 6
The Defence Ministry is planning to lay down a set of rules of engagement (ROE) for the Indian Air Force before it finalises a proposal to allow the latter to take an action in self-defence against the Naxals.

The decision to finally allow the IAF to protect itself in case its choppers were attacked will be taken “at the highest level”, said a senior official of the Ministry. The government is very clear that there is no role for the armed forces — the Army or the IAF — in the anti-Naxal operations. “That has been ruled out so far”, said the official.

The IAF is only carrying out chopper-borne reconnaissance, transportation and medical evacuations in the Naxal-hit areas. The IAF chief Air Chief Marshall PV Naik had told mediapersons recently that he had asked the government to allow “IAF to shoot back at Naxals if they try to attack their choppers.”

According to the sources, the Ministry is not going to give permission to arm the choppers with heavy weapons. Also, the discussions are on as to decide what will tantamount to “self defence”. The IAF wants specific rules of engagement as its choppers have been fired at by Maoists in the past. A sergeant was killed in November last year when Naxals fired at a Mi-8 chopper that was on election duty in Chattisgarh.

The Home Ministry, which is conducting the anti-Naxal operations using paramilitary forces, is also against the use of excessive force or air power for internal security duties on account of collateral damage and brutal power projection.

In the past, the IAF, in its J&K anti-terrorist operations, allowed carrying of INSAS rifles and pistols to defend themselves against the militants.

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/20091007/main4.htm

Army Capable of Countering Chinese Threat: Kapoor

New Delhi

Rubbishing the chances of a repeat of the 1962 Sino-Indian war which China won, Army Chief General Deepak Kapoor today said the Army was "capable of defending" Indian territory and ward off any aggression.

"The Indian Army is capable of looking after and ensuring the defence of the country. It would take care of any aggression against Indian territory," General Kapoor said.

"The charter of the Army is to defend Indian territory at all costs. This talk of a repeat of 1962 is totally incorrect and uncalled for," he said.

Stating that "offensive action" could not be part of any credible defensive posture, the Army chief added that his force was "sincere to ensure the defence of our country to the last drop of our blood."

The Army, Kapoor said, had the requisite capability to defend the Indian territory even if it means deployment of force multipliers. Strengthening and modernisation of the forces was a dynamic process, he added.

"It is an ongoing process and modernisation of the Army is going on. The Chinese too are modernising People's Liberation Army (PLA). We need to build our capabilities to be able to meet the challenges whenever it appears," he told a private news channel.

On the incursions by Chinese military personnel on the Indian side of the Line of Actual Control (LAC) between the two countries, Kapoor said the transgressions by the PLA continued to be at the same level as last year.

"In 2009, so far, the number of transgressions have been almost exactly at the same level as during the corresponding period in 2008," he said.

Claiming that the Chinese military incursions were not under political orders from Beijing, Kapoor said: "There is no provocation (through incursions) per se. There is nothing to be alarmed about it."

The Army Chief said the Chinese have mentioned during Border Personnel Meeting about Indian Army patrols entering their side of the LAC. "Similar charges are made against our patrols," he said.

Blaming the non-demarcation of the LAC as a reason for differing perceptions on both sides, Kapoor said these kind of complaints would keep cropping up time and again till the time the demarcation took place.

Admitting that Indian Army patrols too went into areas perceived to be within their side of the LAC, he said the personnel do leave behind signs of their presence there, such as used food cans and water bottles.

"Obviously, our Army patrols do not carry back the used food cans and water bottles. They are left behind," he added.

On the reports of PLA helicopter dropping food cans in Ladakh in June this year, the Army chief said the Chinese claimed the helicopter was flying within their side of the LAC.

Kapoor said apart from raising the transgressions at Border Personnel Meetings, the Army also took up these issues up through the diplomatic channels.

Talking about China's space capabilities, the Army Chief said India too needed to improve its use of space for military applications "to defend ourselves and to our advantage."

Favouring a dedicated military satellite for Indian armed forces, Kapoor said it would not be wise to use foreign nation's satellites, as there were chances for error.

"When we use others' satellites, then the data could be slightly displaced. If it is our own satellite, we are sure the dimensions are correct," he said.

"We do not have (a dedicated military satellite). But we need to look at space and therefore we need to develop our equipment," he added.

http://news.outlookindia.com/item.aspx?667306

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