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Wednesday, 18 November 2009

From Today's Papers - 18 Nov 09






Air Force: Pregnancy makes women pilots cost-inefficient
Sunetra Choudhary, Tuesday November 17, 2009, New Delhi

In a week's time, President Pratibha Patil will fly a half hour sortie on a Sukhoi. It's a feat also accomplished by her predecessor, President Kalam.

But setting a tone that could kill Patil's high, the Air Force has offered this startling opinion: in general, training women as pilots just isn't cost-efficient. Explaining that it costs about 11 crores to train a pilot, the Vice Chief of the Air Staff stated, "Nature's way of life is that you get married, bring up a family. Now the latest position on ladies flying is that if a lady goes into family way, she is off-duty for 10 out of 12 months. Now while we can always utilize... a lady in some other job, but in the pure profession in which we have invested so much if the poor lady herself who has contributed so much... if we cannot utilise... then it is not fruitful for either party. But we are looking at it and in a few more years we can see a change coming with certain pre-conditions."

Air Marshal PK Barbora is expected to confront a deluge of angry reactions from women activists, and from women in the Armed Forces, who point out that their careers entail daily battles against sexism.

Officially, defence forces say women are not psychologically fit for combat, but the fact that 75-year old Pratibha Patil has been declared fit to fly only adds insult to the injury.

In her defence, President Pratibha Patil's aides say she hops on the treadmill every morning and evening, and works out often with a yoga instructor.

"The President does want empowerment for women," said Archana Datta, OSD to President.

So, while China, Israel, America and even our neighbours Pakistan have all allowed women into combat, Indian forces remain shy. In their defence, India says only one out of 7 women remain in Pakistan's combat force but that's one more than us.

Air Force said that it was the President's desire to fly a fighter plane but for other women, who are not Supreme Commander of Chief, their wish to fly combat cannot be fulfilled just yet.





As snow falls, militants line up to enter India
NDTV Correspondent, Tuesday November 17, 2009, Srinagar

The militant who was captured while trying to infiltrate.
In mountain peaks at 14,000 feet, the snow that is falling thick and deep provides perfect cover for militants looking to cross the border into Indian territory.

As dawn broke on Tuesday in the Tanghdar Sector of North Kashmir, infiltrators attempted to enter India for the fourth time in three days. One of them was killed, the other captured alive, revealing that "he had been under training for three months, from March to June, in the Muzaffarabad camp.

Thereafter, he was shifted for infiltration into Lippa Valley, where he was for 15-odd days. Here he was provided with equipment and guidance material," according to Lieutenant Colonel J S Brar, Defence Spokesperson.

Infiltration attempts are nearly 20 per cent higher this year than last year. And now that winter has set in, after October, there have been 9 attempts in which 17 militants have been killed. India says that the infiltrators are being helped by the Pakistan army, a routine practice. (Read: Pak Army facilitating infiltration, says BSF)

                                                      2009 (Till November)                      2008

Infiltration bids                                         41                                          33
Militants killed                                         71                                          75

The infiltration bids see a rise especially post-October after winter sets in in earnest.

                                             2009 October-November            2008 October-November

Infiltration bids                                          9                                              7
Militants killed                                          9                                             17

''We have inputs from various sources about large numbers of militants waiting at different points along the entire international border and the LoC and different launch pads in Pakistan. The entire border is alerted. The army is alerted at the LoC,'' says Raman Shrivastava the Director General of the Border Security Force.

But on Monday, the Border Security Force lost one of its senior-most officers. Deputy Inspector General OP Kamar was killed when he went to inspect the area near the Pallad checkpost in Samba District which had witnessed firing from across the border on Sunday night. (Read: Top BSFofficer killed in blast)

What worried local officials is that militants seem to have crossed over to plant an Improvised Explosive Device right at the gate of the checkpoint.





DRDO downplays UAV crash
Shubhadeep Choudhury
Tribune News service

Bangalore, November 17
The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) today played down the crash of Rustom-I technology demonstrator, the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) being developed by the Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE) during its first flight at a private airfield near Hosur in Karnataka yesterday.

The DRDO attributed the mishap to “misjudgement of the altitude of the flight”.
DRDO officials said due to wrong judgement of the altitude of the flight, the engine of the UAV was switched off by the ground command. This brought down the on-board thrust developed in the MALE (Medium Altitude Long Endurance) UAV and it crashed. It, however, remained unclear whether the error was a manual one or lied with the gadgets being used by the ground command to control the UAV.
The ADE, part of the DRDO, is leading the Rs 1,000-crore Rustom programme.
The UAV is expected to have capabilities that will match contemporary UAVs such as the Israeli Heron currently in use by the armed forces. The ADE is using the technology demonstrator as a stepping stone to prove the technologies that will go into the Rustom UAV.
The technology demonstrator is smaller in size than the original but has the same configuration as that of a full-fledged Rustom UAV. It was to undertake around 10 flights to check out taxing, taking off and landing like a conventional airplane but devoid of a pilot. Being smaller than the full-fledged production standard, Rustom has endurance of only 12 to 15 hours, approximately half of what the Rustom is being designed for.
“The taxing and take-off of the UAV was exactly as planned. There are a lot of gains from the flight. The flight proved the functioning of number of systems such as aerodynamics, redundant flight control, engine, redundant data link, etc which go a long way towards development of complex UAVs”, the DRDO said in a statement. It added that it was the first flight of the UAV using a 700-kg airframe and sophisticated controls and hence “prone to development hazards”.
Rustom is being developed by the DRDO for the Army, the Navy and the IAF. It is proposed to supplement the Israeli UAVs in service with the Indian armed forces.
Rustom is proposed to see the enemy territory up to a distance of 250 km and carry a variety of cameras and radar for surveillance.





New Delhi, November 17
India’s sea-borne aircraft carrier INS Viraat has re-joined duties on the western sea front facing Pakistan. Navy chief Admiral Nirmal Verma will go onboard the Viraat as part of his visit to Mumbai to review the coastal security preparedness of the force. 

As part of his three-day visit to the western naval command beginning tomorrow, Verma would sail on the flagship Viraat during a coastal security exercise that the western fleet of the Navy would carry out in the Arabian Sea to review the apparatus put in after the 26/11 Mumbai attacks. “The Navy chief will witness fleet exercises, gun and missile firings by ships and aircraft operations onboard INS Viraat, which has rejoined the fleet after an extensive maintenance period, during the ship sortie off Mumbai,” Navy officials said here yesterday. — TNS





Women as fighter pilots bad investment: IAF
Agencies
ALL MEN FORCE: Senior IAF officer says women will have to wait to be fighter pilots.

New Delhi: The Indian Air Force (IAF) will be flying President Pratibha Patil in a Sukhoi fighter jet, but it will have to wait for women to be fighter pilots.

Vice-Chief of Air Staff, Air Marshal P K Barbora, on Tuesday gave a statement, which suggests that women IAF officers must delay pregnancy if they want to become fighter pilots.

“We might see this change (women as fighter pilots) coming in with certain pre-conditions - that till this age we require you to be happy, be married (but) let us hope that you don't have an offspring,” said Barbora at a press conference in New Delhi.

Barbora suggested that women officers must plan a child only after “13-14 years of flying service” when “investments” made on a fighter pilot will be recovered by the Air Force.

“We can induct women fighter pilots for show purposes. But we spend an exorbitant amount on training fighter pilots, and if we are not able to utilise them optimally, it may not be prudent to have women fighter pilots at the moment,” said Barbora.

“Once the lady goes the family way, she will be off flying for 10 months. And when we have invested so much, it is not a fruitful development.”

Barbora, however, assured women IAF officers that there would be a change down the line.

“A few years from now, there will be some change. However, we will not induct women just for the sake of it but for optimally utilising their potential,” he said.

Barbora’s statement may trigger a controversy and reflects the military’s discomfort with using women for combat roles, reports CNN-IBN’s Associate Editor, Defence, Vishal Thapar.

IANS reports the IAF currently has 784 women officers working in different branches, but that they are barred from the fighter pilot stream.







Pakistan has more nuclear weapons than India: report
Press Trust Of India
GUARDED? India is believed to have 60-80 nuclear weapons as compared to Pakistan's 70-90.

Washington: Pakistan is estimated to have more nuclear warheads than India and the two Asian neighbours along with China are increasing their arsenals and deploying weapons at more sites, two eminent American nuclear experts have said.

While Pakistan is estimated to possess 70-90 nuclear weapons, India is believed to have 60-80, claims Robert S Norris and Hans M Kristensen in their latest article Nuclear Notebook: Worldwide deployments of nuclear weapons, 2009.

The article published in the latest issue of 'Bulletin of the Atomic Science' claimed that Beijing, Islamabad, and New Delhi are quantitatively and qualitatively increasing their arsenals and deploying weapons at more sites, yet the locations are difficult to pinpoint.

For example, no reliable public information exists on where Pakistan or India produces its nuclear weapons, it said.

"Whereas many of the Chinese bases are known, this is not the case in Pakistan and India, where we have found no credible information that identifies permanent nuclear weapons storage locations," they said.

"Pakistan's nuclear weapons are not believed to be fully operational under normal circumstances, India is thought to store its nuclear warheads and bombs in central storage locations rather than on bases with operational forces. But, since all three countries are expanding their arsenals, new bases and storage sites probably are under construction," the two nuclear experts said.





Govt never made up its mind to go to war with Pak after 26/11'
The terrorist attacks on Mumbai on November 26, 2008 brought India and Pakistan to the brink of war, or so it was widely believed.

A lot of emphasis, in those anxious days just after the attacks, had been laid on the Indian Air Force which was believed to be kept on standby and was all set to launch an attack on Pakistan.

Air Chief Marshal Fali Homi Major, then the chief of the air staff, was in the thick of action because of the several warnings from the Intelligence Bureau that Pakistan-based terrorists may try and launch an aerial attack on India.

Now retired from the Indian Air Force, Air Chief Marshal Major speaks to rediff.com's Vicky Nanjappa and looks back at that dreaded day when Mumbai was attacked by 10 terrorists from the Lashkar-e-Tayiba.

In a major revelation, he says while the IAF was ready for battle, the government did not make up its mind on whether to go to war with Pakistan.

The eyeball to eyeball confrontation between the two countries was clear after the Mumbai attacks. We all thought that India would go to war against Pakistan. What made everyone change their mind?

Nobody changed their mind. In fact, the government never made up its mind to go to war.

I know the sentiment of the entire country was that of anger and disgust.

The Indian Air Force was ready to strike at Pakistan. We had our contingency ready and were well prepared. However, ultimately it depends on what the government wants.

There was also talk of an air strike along the border to destroy jihadi camps.

Yes, there was. However, the government was not in favour of an air strike across the border as it felt that it would escalate into a full fledged war.
By the time Pak's role was established the will was lost'
The terrorist attacks on Mumbai on November 26, 2008 brought India and Pakistan to the brink of war, or so it was widely believed.

A lot of emphasis, in those anxious days just after the attacks, had been laid on the Indian Air Force which was believed to be kept on standby and was all set to launch an attack on Pakistan.

Air Chief Marshal Fali Homi Major, then the chief of the air staff, was in the thick of action because of the several warnings from the Intelligence Bureau that Pakistan-based terrorists may try and launch an aerial attack on India.

Now retired from the Indian Air Force, Air Chief Marshal Major speaks to rediff.com's Vicky Nanjappa and looks back at that dreaded day when Mumbai was attacked by 10 terrorists from the Lashkar-e-Tayiba.

In a major revelation, he says while the IAF was ready for battle, the government did not make up its mind on whether to go to war with Pakistan.

The eyeball to eyeball confrontation between the two countries was clear after the Mumbai attacks. We all thought that India would go to war against Pakistan. What made everyone change their mind?

Nobody changed their mind. In fact, the government never made up its mind to go to war.

I know the sentiment of the entire country was that of anger and disgust.

The Indian Air Force was ready to strike at Pakistan. We had our contingency ready and were well prepared. However, ultimately it depends on what the government wants.

There was also talk of an air strike along the border to destroy jihadi camps.

Yes, there was. However, the government was not in favour of an air strike across the border as it felt that it would escalate into a full fledged war.

What was the mood among the members of the armed forces the day Mumbai was attacked on November 26, 2008?

Like all people in this country, we too were shocked. It was an audacious attack on Indian soil and we were all truly shocked. The attack surely shook the entire country up.

How do you see Indian preparedness today to deal with a similar situation? Do you think we are better prepared after 26/11?

I am certain that we are better prepared today. However, it is not correct to expect results overnight. I would not say that the paramilitary forces and homeland security are fully equipped, since procurements would take some more time.

However, what is good is that the process has begun. This is a good sign because this was lacking prior to this attack.

You said the attack shocked everyone including those in the armed forces. Did you at any point of time think that it would be better to strike at Pakistan immediately?

Yes, it did shake us all up. But it is not that easy to strike at a country. Before going ahead and striking at a country, we need to establish a concrete link that the country (Pakistan) was involved in the attack.

This was the thinking in the government too that it first needs to be established that Pakistan had a role to play. However, by the time it was established the will was lost.

There was talk at that point of time that the air force was not in a position to carry out an attack. There was a similar opinion about the other wings of the defence forces.

That is not correct. I would say with a great deal of confidence that the armed forces are in some form of readiness at all times.

Let us talk about the Indian Air Force in particular. There was a warning that there could be an aerial strike by jihadis and somehow there was talk that we were not ready. How serious is the threat of an aerial attack?

We were aware of this threat. Frankly speaking, an aerial attack is not really a threat since the IAF has the capability to tackle this threat with ease.

When one talks of an aerial attack, a comparison is drawn to the one carried out by the LTTE (the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam) in Sri Lanka. That was just one plane and it is not difficult for the IAF to deal with such a problem.

Once again, I would say that our readiness to carry out a strike was always high and there is no doubting the capabilities of the Indian Air Force.

The threat of terrorism is still large. Do you think war would have been the better solution rather than depending heavily on diplomatic pressure?

Personally, I don't think that war is the right solution to counter a terror attack. If you start going to war for every terror strike then all countries would be at war with each other at all times.

Moreover, following the 26/11 attacks in Mumbai, the question of whether to go to war or not was a big decision for the Government of India.

We seem to have China phobia and get quite perturbed by their threats. Is it because we cannot match up to their military might?

India does not need to worry too much about China. They may have quantity, but cannot match our quality. Moreover, the scenario is not the same as 1962 and China cannot mess with India as it did in 1962.

Our forces are well equipped and the Indian brain is far ahead when compared to the Chinese brain.

The phobia of 1962 is definitely over and our deployment along the Indo-China border is very good.






India should build asymmetric warfare capabilities: Antony
Agencies Posted online: Monday , Nov 16, 2009 at 1824 hrs
New Delhi : With gaps in the military capabilities of India and China growing, Defence Minister A K Antony on Monday said the country should "build" asymmetric warfare capabilities to counter threats from larger armed forces.

"We (Indians) need to conceptualise and build asymmetric capabilities against superior forces," Antony told the first Consultative Committee meeting of new Members of Parliament attached to the Defence Ministry, which dwelt on the Indian Air Force (IAF) strengths and weaknesses, here.

He said the government's endeavours were aimed at ensuring the IAF's capabilities are in consonance with India's stature, aspirations and threat perceptions, and it was taking a series of steps to develop the IAF into a "dominant aerospace power."

The Defence Minister said the steps included enhancing significantly the strategic reach of IAF to operate effectively far away from the Indian mainland and integrating potent capabilities in terms of space-based assets, air defence, surveillance, modern aircraft and advanced weapon systems.

Referring to the perspective plans of the Armed Forces, he said the gestation period for induction of new equipment was long and, therefore, there should be clarity in strategic assessments and projection of requirements.

"We need to hasten our procurements to prevent voids in defence preparedness," he added.

Antony said efforts are also being made in the Defence Ministry and its various wings to ensure that the country reached the level of developed countries in defence technologies, without going through all the intermediate steps.

"In our drive for modernisation and in execution of our daily tasks, we must be ever mindful of economy and avoid waste or duplication. We must lend our shoulders to indigenisation and think of ways in which we can reach the level of advanced states without necessarily following all the intermediate steps," he said.

Antony informed the members that IAF was in the process of considerable transformation and modernisation. Giving an account of various projects, he said the 'Hawk' Advanced Jet Trainers had already been inducted into the IAF, the inter-governmental agreements on the Fifth General Fighter Aircraft and Multi role Transport Aircraft had been inked with the Russians, and the evaluation process for the selection of 126 Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft was on.

The Members of Parliament, appreciating the IAF's role over the years in not only protecting the country but also providing humanitarian relief during natural disasters, wanted to know its road map for the next 10-20 years to meet the security challenges.


Some members expressed their concern over cases of corruption in acquisition process and under-utilisation of funds earmarked for capital acquisition. IAF vice chief Air Marshal P K Barbora gave a detailed account of various measures being taken by the Air Force to spread its assets across the country, as also to keep the morale of air warriors high.

The MPs, who attended the Consultative Committee meeting included Murli Manohar Joshi, Shivaji Adhalrao Patil, Harsh Vardhan, Manish Tewari, Lalit Mohan Suklabaidya and S S Ramasubbu, all from the Lok Sabha, and Ram Chandra Khuntia, Shivanand Tiwari, Janardhan Waghmare and Veer Singh from the Rajya Sabha.





Army’s Projects Poor Combat Capabilities

The Indian Army has been going through a rough patch due to the delays in acquisitions of crucial systems and it has recently admitted that it has achieved only 50% of the capabilities required to defend the country’s borders and to counter insurgencies.

To add to the bleakness of the situation, it has been projected that it will take another 20 years to achieve 100% capability to repel any act of aggression. This internal assessment report has been submitted to members of the standing committee on defence.

As per the Indian Army’s ’state of capability development’ assessment, most of its arms, including the infantry, artillery and armoured, would achieve 100% capability only by around 2027.The report says the infantry, artillery and mechanised forces have achieved about 60% of the capability required.

The Indian Army’s aim to become a modern military with full network-centric capability will only become true by year 2027. As of now, the capability of the Indian Army is a mere 24 per cent. The story of the Indian Army continues to become worrisome. The artillery has just 52% of the total capability required to defend the country.

The projection is shocking in case of combat helicopters where the army has achieved just 17% capability. The mechanised units of the army have achieved 62% of the required capabilities, while the engineers have achieved 60%. Special Forces and Para units have achieved 69% of the capabilities required. The infantry, the army admits in the report, has only achieved 65% of its capability. The armoured regiments have reached 71% of the capability development, the best compared to other arms.

All in all, India’s state of capability development stands at over 51 per cent with respect to the Indian Army and its arms. The main reason has been acquisition delays of crucial systems and modernization of artillery.




Army’s Northern Command hospital performs marrow transplant
admin on November 17, 2009 — Leave a Comment

Jammu, Nov 17 (IANS) The Indian Army’s Northern Command hospital at Udhampur in Jammu and Kashmir has successfully performed bone marrow transplant in a cancer patient, becoming the first institution in the state to offer this specialised treatment, officials said Tuesday.

The process was performed on a 50-year-old serving soldier, suffering from multiple myeloma (a cancer of the white blood cells), Northern Command spokesman Maj. S.K. Rathi said.

The transplant was carried out Oct 29 and the patient is responding positively, he added.

The patient underwent chemotherapy at the hospital and after the disease was brought under control, the autologous stem cell transplant was performed.

Lt.Col. Tarun Verma, a clinical haematologist, performed the transplant procedure in collaboration with the Regional Cancer Centre and Transfusion Medicine Department of the Government Medical College, Jammu.

The procedure was overseen by cardiologist Col. Prashant Bharadwaj, the head of the Medicine department, while commandant Maj.Gen. Harinder Singh ensured that all the necessary drugs and equipment were procured on priority to perform this life saving procedure, the spokesman said.

The patient is now convalescing in Command Hospital. More transplants, both autologous and allogenic, are planned in future, he added.

Bone marrow transplantation consists of destroying the diseased bone marrow with chemotherapy and replacing it with normally functioning marrow cells. It is a highly specialised procedure, performed in a handful of transplant centres in the country, which has now been made available in Jammu and Kashmir.




Barracuda pitches camouflage system to Indian Army
Saturday, November 14, 2009
By Saurabh Joshi

Saab’s unit Barracuda Camouflage has pitched its products to the Indian Army, for both vehicles as well as individual troops. The firm’s Mobile Camouflage System or MCS was tested at Suratgarh last summer, by the CVRDE (Combat Vehicles Research & Development Establishment), Chennai and the Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur. The CVRDE makes many of India’s armored vehicles, including the Arjun Main Battle Tank (MBT)

While normally camouflaged tanks were spotted by six spotters over a distance of 2400 meters, vehicles with the benefit of the MCS were could only be spotted at a distance of 1600 meters. “So then the relative advantage is 800 meters,” says Naresh Ummat, Managing Director of Barracuda Camouflage.

According to Ummat, a global tender was issued in 2007. “We had to study the product and the temperatures involved. We made some preliminary fittings. We gave them three sets of mobile camouflage. While in the field it must perform with the given parameters, it must also adhere to what the company claims in the laboratory,” he says.

The Indian Army, he says, is also interested in the MCS for its T-72 and T-90 tanks. Ummat says the camouflage has already been supplied for Prithvi missiles in the Indian Army.

One feature of this camouflage system is that it works to try and bring the temperature variance of the vehicle and the surrounding environment to within four degrees Celsius.

Barracuda has also offered its individual soldier-specific Special Operations Tactical Camouflage Suiting. This system, when tested by the Indian Army’s Northern Command, denied detection to 45 meters, where ordinarily it was 200 meters. The SOTCS is also available for all kinds of terrain including jungle, snow, desert etc. “We have now been asked for laboratory tests. This should happen in the next two weeks. We should be able to get a consolidated report within a month,” says Ummat, who also expects the army to be interested in MCS systems for 30 per cent of its armored vehicles.



India destabilising Pakistan
By: Ashraf Javed

LAHORE – Explosive material used in the deadly bomb blast which took place at Khyber Bazaar Peshawar last month, was identical to what had been used in exploding Samjhota Express in India, sources confined to The Nation Monday.

The explosive material – Vehicle Born Improvised Explosive Device (VBIED) – was used in Khyber Bazaar bomb blast.

Sources say the Pakistani security agencies have found concrete evidences to prove Indian involvement in Khyber Bazaar blast in which VBIED was used.

Sources close the development revealed that the Indian intelligence agency Research and Analysis Wing (RAW) was behind the terrible blast which left more than 42 innocent people dead and 100 others wounded, including women and children.

“Lt Col Prohit of the Indian Army who is the prime accused in the Samjhota Express explosion case, was the expert and qualified to handle VBIED and its manufacturing process,” sources said.

Sources further disclosed that the security agencies had nabbed several suspects in connection with the Peshawar blast during the recent crackdown from different parts of the country.

“Investigations are underway as the arrested suspects are being grilled. The investigators have found some important leads during the interrogation,” a source privy to the investigators said, but did not mention any further details due to the sensitivity of the matter.

The recent revelations have strengthened the contention that Col Prohit and his team was also responsible for the Samjhauta blast.

Last year, the prosecutor had told an Indian court that Prohit had procured RDX from Jammu and Kashmir while used part of it in Samjhauta blasts. However, the prosecutor retracted the claim the next day under duress.

The Indian government had promised after the Samjhota Express tragedy that it would share its findings with Pakistan. However, little has been shared with Pakistan, sources maintained adding, in the Joint Anti Terror Mechanism (JATM) meetings, India had also admitted that it had “run against a wall” in the investigation.

With the involvement of Hindu extremist groups resurfacing in the wake of the blasts, it has been reported that a team comprising police and CBI officials had zeroed in on Hindu extremist groups in Indore in connection with the Samjhauta Express blasts in 2007 in which 68 people, mostly Pakistanis, were killed. Investigators have found that certain items such as suitcases, bottles and batteries used in the blasts were purchased from Indore.

Interestingly, while most Muslim suspects in terror cases are charged under the stringent Maharashtra Control of Organised Crime Act (MCOCA), Prohit and his co-accused were not booked under it according to a court decision on 31 July.

Ironically, the Indian spy agencies are secretly patronising Hindu hardliners to destabilise Pakistan by setting up training camps in several parts of India. On the other hand Indian government and agencies have launched malicious campaign against Pakistan and its security agencies alleging that Pakistani intelligence agencies are using Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) for conducting attacks on Indian economic hubs by pumping money to terrorist network as part of its propaganda campaign. Recently, the Indian prime minister proclaimed that tumultuous situation in Pakistan raised the possibility of terrorist attacks in India. Such an attempt is aimed at detracting the world opinion against Pakistan.

It is worth mentioning that the India is tarnishing Pakistan’s image abroad by trumpeting and whipping up Mumbai firing incident.

The Khyber Bazaar suicide blast was the most devastating as according to the experts the explosives used in the explosion were not more than 50 kg but it went off amid one of the busiest markets functioning in provincial capital, causing the worst damage.

At least 100 kg explosive material was used in another suicide attack on Syed Fakhr-e-Alam Road on September 28, the less destructive one, which killed 18 people, experts said.




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