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Sunday, 16 May 2010

From Today's Papers - 16 May 2010






DRDO spin-off may turn lifesaver for heart patients
Vijay Mohan Tribune News Service  Chandigarh, May 15 Technology developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) for hi-end scientific applications like rocket sled may become the lifesaver of patients who have suffered a cardiac arrest.  Terminal Ballistics Research Laboratory (TBRL), a DRDO establishment based here, has conceived a system based upon wireless telemetry that facilitates pre-hospital initiation of thrombolytic treatment during the “golden hour” by significantly reducing the time from emergency call to initial treatment and thereby, reducing the extent of damage to the heart.  Telemetry is a technology that allows remote measurement and reporting of information and is vital in the development phase of missiles, satellites and aircraft. It also has use in other fields like water and energy monitoring.  Cardiac arrest occurs when flow of blood to the heart is blocked. This derives vital oxygen to heart cells and if supply is not restored within a specific period, the portion of the heart cells and muscles become permanently dead.  “The first hour or so after the attack, called the golden hour, is crucial and much time is lost in transporting the patient to a medical centre. If the patient’s condition and medical parameters can be assessed by specialists during this period and requisite action is taken by para-medical staff, the chances of recuperation increase significantly,” PK Khosla, Group Director with TBRL said.  “This is where telemetry would come in and would be especially useful if patients are to be brought in from rural or far-off places,” he added. A paper in this regard was presented at a conference on emerging medical instrumentation here by Khosla and other experts, from C-DAC and Thapar University, Patiala, involved in the project.  Such a system for medical applications is not in use in India and in other parts is being introduced on an experimental basis. “We have developed and perfected the technology for our own use. It is only to be adapted and optimised for use in medical field,” Khosla said.  The system involves a gadget of the size of a computer CPU to be installed in any ambulance and attached to the medical instruments onboard. This would have a direct point-to-point link through microwave with the base unit at the medical centre, which would provide cardiologists real time information on the patient’s condition and enable them to instruct para-medics accordingly.  Though the telemetry system used by DRDO is much larger in size, the one envisioned for medical applications is much smaller and can be economised. Moreover, all required hardware and software is indigenous and available in the country through the private sector. This would also enable mass adaptation of the system.







Jihadis camping in PoK to sneak into India Most activities concentrated in Neelum valley along LoC 
Islamabad, May 15 Militants have regrouped in large numbers in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir and are waiting to cross the Line of Control to sneak into the Indian side of the Himalayan region, residents and politicians have said.  The militants have regrouped and launched ‘jihadi’ activities in the Neelum valley on the Pakistani side of the LoC, local politician Arif Shahid said. Local residents and Shahid said the militants were not from PoK. "Jihadi activities have restarted during the last few weeks,” said Shahid, the secretary general of the All Parties National Alliance. “Most of the activities are concentrated in the Neelum valley along the LoC,” he told the BBC.  Shahid, who had visited the region with other APNA leaders, said the militants were based there in large numbers and had set up camps in the area. “The men are not locals -- they have long hair and beards. Most do not speak the local language,” he said.  Residents of Neelum valley backed Shahid's assertions. "We are scared… The armed men are moving around the area and are trying to cross the border,” a local resident said. “We can make out from their appearances and languages they are not from any part of Kashmir,” the resident said.  Shahid said he believed that militants are planning to sabotage ongoing peace negotiations between India and Pakistan. “They have set up camps in the region and many are crossing the border… This is the start of another proxy war,” he said.  Following a meeting between Pakistan Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani and his Indian counterpart Manmohan Singh last month, the Foreign Ministers of the two countries recently agreed to meet in Islamabad on July 15 to nudge the peace process forward.  From 1988, militants aided by Pakistan's security forces and intelligence agencies waged a guerrilla campaign in Jammu and Kashmir. Their activities were curtailed during the rule of former President Pervez Musharraf, who quit in August 2008.  The BBC quoted unnamed officials as saying that jihadi activities had recommenced across the LoC in recent weeks. It also quoted its correspondents as saying that the renewed militant activity is bound to be of concern to India, especially when Delhi and Islamabad almost came to war when militants — accused by India of being Pakistan-based -- attacked Indian Parliament in December 2001.  Shahid's comments were supported by Jammu and Kashmir National Liberation Front leader Shaukat Maqbool Bhat. “The fighters are there and they are regularly crossing into India,” Bhat said. “The local people are very scared — they believe the (militant) crossings are going to restart artillery exchanges between the Pakistani and Indian armies,” Bhat said.  Indian and Pakistani troops regularly fought artillery duels and exchanged small arms fire till a ceasefire was put in place along the LoC in November 2003. — PTI





Armed Forces Day 2010: A tribute to the US Army
May 15, 2010 is celebrated as Armed Forces Day. Every year third Saturday of the May is observed as the Armed Forces Day. The motto of Armed Forces Day 2010 is United is Strength.
TODAY IS May 15 and the day is celebrated as Armed Forces Day. Every year third Saturday of the May is observed as the Armed Forces Day. The motto of Armed Forces Day 2010 is United is Strength. The day is dedicated to honor the Armed Forces of US.   The day was first celebrated on May 20, 1950. The theme of the day in 1950 was Teamed for Defense which expressed the unification of all the military forces under one government department. The day is observed to expand public understanding of the type of duty is performed by a military person and role of military in the life of a common person.   People across the country are paying tribute to the army personnel who have dedicated their live in the service of the nation. Special parades are being held to celebrate the day. Special lessons are taught in the schools to help children understand of army in the country.   President Obama’s proclamation, in 2009, read that the Secretary of Defense of Secretary of Homeland Security should organize observance between both the branches and the private section to recognize Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and the Coast Guards each year.






Militants regrouping in PoK to cross over to Indian side
Press Trust of India, Saturday May 15, 2010, Islamabad Militants have regrouped in large numbers in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK) and are crossing the Line of Control (LoC) to sneak into the Indian side of the Himalayan region, local residents and political leaders have said.  The militants have regrouped and launched jehadi activities in the Neelum valley on the Pakistani side of the LoC, local politician Arif Shahid said. Local residents and Shahid said the militants were not from PoK.  "Jihadi activities have been restarted during the last few weeks," said Shahid, the secretary general of the All Parties National Alliance (APNA).  "Most of the activities are concentrated in the Neelum valley along the LoC," Shahid told the BBC.  Shahid, who had visited the region with other APNA leaders, said the militants were based there in large numbers and had set up camps in the area.  "The men are not locals. They have long hair and beards. Most do not speak the local language," he said.  Residents of Neelum valley backed Shahid's assertions. "We are scared... The armed men are moving around the area and are trying to cross the border," a local resident said.  "We can make out from their appearances and languages they are not from any part of Kashmir," the resident said.  Shahid said he believed that militants are planning to sabotage ongoing peace negotiations between India and Pakistan.  "They have set up camps in the region and many are crossing the border... This is the start of another proxy war," he said.  Following a meeting between Pakistan Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani and his Indian counterpart Manmohan Singh last month, the Foreign Ministers of the two countries recently agreed to meet in Islamabad on July 15 to nudge the peace process forward.  Shahid's comments were supported by Jammu and Kashmir National Liberation Front leader Shaukat Maqbool Bhat. "The fighters are there and they are regularly crossing into India," Bhat said.  "The local people are very scared. They believe the (militant) crossings are going to restart artillery exchanges between the Pakistani and Indian armies," Bhat said.          Indian and Pakistani troops regularly fought artillery duels and exchanged small arms fire till a ceasefire was put in place along the LoC in November 2003.  From 1988, militants aided by Pakistan's security forces and intelligence agencies waged a guerrilla campaign in Jammu and Kashmir. Their activities were curtailed during the rule of former President Pervez Musharraf, who quit in August 2008.  The BBC quoted unnamed officials as saying that jehadi activities had recommenced across the LoC in recent weeks. It also quoted its correspondents as saying that the renewed militant activity is bound to be of concern to India, especially when Delhi and Islamabad almost came to war when militants accused by India of being Pakistani-based attacked the Indian parliament in December 2001.







Hizbul Mujahideen's recruitment drive
NDTV Correspondent, Saturday May 15, 2010, Jammu NDTV has gained access to an exclusive video of the terror outfit, the Hizbul Mujahideen and one of its key leaders Shahdeen Khanday. The video has been shot by the militants on a cell phone to promote their cause and it shows Khanday posing with a 12-bore rifle in one hand and a bird in the other. With him are two other commanders, Gamma and Toufiq.   Former DIG of Doda, Satveer Gupta says, "He (Shahdeen Khanday) doesn't remain at one place. You will always find him shifting from one place to another place, he knows that the police and paramilitary forces are chasing him."  The cell phone was recovered two months after an Army operation on the Kishtwar range targeted at Khanday. The militants managed to escape but left the cell phone behind in their hideout. Security forces say that the video, which portrays the Hizbul as a heroic cause, is a clear sign of desperation.   "They are not getting recruitment and now they are employing these tactics are for mass contact and attracting the youth," says Ashok Gupta, IG Police, Jammu.  Khanday has been an active militant for two decades and has always managed to dodge security forces, but sources say, he has moved away from active militancy operations. Instead he's focusing on strategy as a planner and organizer for the Hizbul Mujahideen.  According to the police, depleting cadres and a number of unsuccessful infiltration bids is forcing the militants to spread propaganda to attract youth towards them and with men like Shahdeen Khanday still out there in the open, planning and coordinating militancy, it is always going to be a tough challenge for the security forces.








Investigations on Against Army Officer for Allegedly Spying for Pakistan 
A Major of the Indian Army is being interrogated ever since an alert from the US Intelligence reached the Ministry of Defence in April 2010 regarding suspicious activities of the Officer. The Major on duty in the Andaman & Nicobar Islands was thought to have established contact with Pakistan and provide it with confidential information.  Consequently, an operation of counter-intelligence started and the Intelligence wing of the Indian Army embarked on action whereby the Officer was asked to come to New Delhi (India).  During the initial phase of interrogation, the Officer claimed that he was innocent, as he didn't even know that his PC sent information to Pakistan. According to him, those e-mails sent from his system could possibly be a result of some virus or malware. Oneindia.in reported this on May 6, 2010.  The Officer's explanation, nevertheless, couldn't persuade the officials of Military Intelligence (MI) as his PC was lately formatted and cleaned.  Moreover, when his PC was put under a forensic test, it was revealed that the system indeed sent certain secret information to Pakistan.  Actually, suspicion on the Officer further increased as it was known that he wasn't authorized to make an entry into the database covering the secret information.  As of now, the MI officials have seized his PC's hard disk and sent it to a lab in Hyderabad (India) so that its deleted content can be further examined.  Meanwhile, the investigation is on so as to find out whether the Major himself sent the confidential information or if a PC virus did the act. In light of this, Col. S Om Singh, the Army Spokesperson, told interviewer that he would've to uncover all the related details after which he'd return with his findings. News.in.msn.com published this on May 6, 2010.  Finally, it's not just this Army Officer who reportedly came under MI's scanner in the recent times for allegedly spying for Pakistan. During the last week of April 2010, a diplomat from India on duty as an IFS-Group B Officer at the Pakistan-situated Indian High Commission was detained because he was found spying for Pakistan.


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