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Sunday, 28 November 2010

From Today's Papers - 28 Nov 2010







North Korea warns against naval drills  Seoul, November 27 Hours before joint naval exercises by the US and the South Korean navy on the Yellow Sea were scheduled to begin on Sunday, tension mounted in the Korean peninsula with North Korea warning that if the US nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, George Washington, does go ahead with the drill, “no one can predict the ensuing consequences”.  It would be an “unpardonable provocation”, declared N. Korea on Saturday and promised “a sea of fire” if its territory was violated.  Tension has escalated in the region after North Korea shelled an island, Yeonpyeong, for an hour on Tuesday in which two S. Korean marines and two civilians were killed. N. Korea claimed to have been provoked into shelling the island following firing by S. Korean marines stationed in the island. While S. Korea admits that a firing exercise was on at the time, it claims that the practice shelling was directed into the sea. In any case such exercises had taken place regularly in the past, it added.  While the United States has been urging China to restrain Pyongyang (the North Korean capital), the Chinese foreign ministry on Saturday objected to military exercises in its economic zone ‘without its permission’.   While economic waters extend to 200 nautical miles off the coastline, the territorial waters extend to 12 nautical miles off the coast. In 2001 Chinese fighters had intercepted a US spy plane over the sea and forced it to land. Washington again reiterated that the naval exercises had been planned long back and were meant to deter North Korea and was not aimed at China. The new South Korean Defence Minister, Kim Kwan Jin, however added to the uncertainty on Saturday by vowing, “ We will repay North Korea a thousand-fold for killing and harming our marines” even as the funeral was held of the four men killed on Tuesday. There is rising anger in Seoul as people demanded retaliation and revenge.  In response, North Korea declared that civilian deaths were ‘regrettable’ but accused Seoul of using civilians as human shields. The five disputed islands off the North Korean coast were abandoned by Pyongyang during the Korean war ( 1950-53) because it did not have a strong enough naval force to counter the US Navy. The islands since then are heavily manned by S. Korean marines with a sprinkling of fishermen.  While a ceasefire was declared in 1953 ( after an estimated 2 million Korean civilians and 30 thousand US troops were killed in the war), technically the two Koreas have been at war because no peace treaty was ever signed.  Experts believe that Tuesday’s shelling was designed to drive away civilians from the disputed islands and to boost the image of the designated successor and son of N. Korean strongman, Kim Jong-il, who is believed to be ailing.  Meanwhile, hectic attempts were on to defuse the crisis. — Agencies

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2010/20101128/main3.htm
NATO for better ties with India Ashok Tuteja/TNS  Why this enhanced interest?      * NATO members are seeing India as an emerging power, a fast growing economy which will increasingly depend on free access to trade routes, sea lanes and communication network.     * India and most NATO member states share basic values, having been founded basically on the same principles.     * NATO nations feel India can contribute in a valuable way to development in Afghanistan and obviously it would also contribute to more stability in the region.  New Delhi, November 27 In a significant development reflecting India’s growing role in the region, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) has sent feelers to New Delhi seeking greater partnership with this country for ensuring stability in South Asia.  Senior NATO officials are believed to have held a few meetings with Indian Ambassador to Belgium Jaimini Bhagwati as part of the overtures being made by the 28-member alliance towards New Delhi. Contacts at lower levels with the Indian authorities have also been established by NATO in recent months, diplomatic sources here said.  India has also viewed positively the outcome of the recent NATO Summit at Lisbon at which the grouping gave ample signs of transforming itself into playing a global-political military role.  At the Lisbon summit, NATO leaders also agreed to launch a transition process by which Afghan security forces will increasingly take the lead for security operations across the country, starting early 2011 and to be completed by 2014.  Shortly after the Lisbon meet, NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen also called for a dialogue with India to strengthen relations between the two sides. “I see several reasons for an increased strengthened relationship between India and NATO,” he was quoted as saying in the European media.  Rasmussen is a former Danish Prime Minister and has met Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on several occasions to discuss security issues. The sources gave three major reasons for NATO seeking to build relationship with India.  First, NATO members are seeing India as an emerging power, a fast growing economy which will increasingly depend on free access to trade routes, sea lanes and communication network. They believe that India and NATO members share a global security interest and can cooperate in counter piracy and cyber security.  Secondly, the sources said, India and most NATO member states share basic values, having been founded basically on the same principles.  The third reason being advanced by NATO is India’s crucial role in the region. The NATO members feel India can contribute in a valuable way to development in Afghanistan and obviously it would also contribute to more stability in the region.

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2010/20101128/nation.htm#4
Mumbai Police files case in Adarsh Society papers reportedly missing Mumbai Police on Saturday said that they had registered a case of theft after a senior Maharashtra Government official informed them about the disappearance of key papers relating to the scam-tainted Adarsh housing society. Source : ANI   Sat, Nov 27, 2010 16:07:17 IST Views: 9    Comments: 0 Rate:  1 out of 5 2 out of 5 3 out of 5 4 out of 5 5 out of 5 0.0 / 0 votes              MUMBAI POLICE on Saturday said that they had registered a case of theft after a senior Maharashtra Government official informed them about the disappearance of key papers relating to the scam-tainted Adarsh housing society.  Deputy Commissioner of Police Cherring Dorje told reporters here that the state’s Urban Development Secretary Gurudas Bajpe had given a written complaint to the Marine Drive Police Station about the missing documents.  "We have registered a case against unknown persons. According to the UD department officials, several papers from the 10 files on Adarsh society were missing," Dorje said.  The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) has also been informed about the missing papers, added Dorje and a senior CBI official.  The papers reportedly included the comments of senior state government bureaucrats and then chief minister Ashok Chavan.  The concerned authorities in the state urban development department are being questioned.  The Adarsh Society was originally meant to be a six-storey structure to house Kargil war heroes and war widows. It was converted into a 31-storey building and flats were allotted to bureaucrats, politicians' relatives and senior defence officers.  Former Maharastra chief minister Ashok Chavan had to scarifies from his post in connection of Adarsh Housing Society scam in November.

http://www.merinews.com/article/mumbai-police-files-case-in-adarsh-society-papers-reportedly-missing/15836333.shtml
India, China to hold crucial border talks ahead of Wen's visit Press Trust of India / Beijing November 27, 2010, 18:03 IST  Special Representatives of India and China will hold the crucial 14th round of border talks here on Monday to resolve the long-running boundary dispute between the two countries, ahead of a key visit of Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao to New Delhi.  National Security Advisor (NSA) Shivshankar Menon, the designated Special Representative of India who is arriving here tomorrow on a three-day visit, would hold talks with his Chinese counterpart State Councillor Dai Bingguo on November 29 and 30 to find a way forward to resolve the boundary dispute.  The last round was held in New Delhi in 2009 between the then NSA, M K Narayanan and Dai which ended without much progress.  India and China share about 4,000-km long borders. China has staked claims to Akasai Chin in the Ladakh region and Arunachal Pradesh, which Beijing refers to as southern Tibet.  Though India-China began discussions to resolve the border difference since 1980, the process got an impetus after the two countries agreed to hold talks by designated Special Representatives.  The two countries also signed agreements in 1993 and 1996 to maintain peace and stability in the border areas.  In 2005, China and India signed a political guiding principle on demarcation of the boundary.  The border issue came up for discussion during Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's meeting with Wen last month on the sidelines of the ASEAN summit in Hanoi.  On the boundary problem, both Singh and Wen said they looked forward to early resolution of the issue and asked their Special Representatives to deal with the subject with a sense of urgency.  The latest round of Special Representative talks from Monday assume significance as it will the final high-level discussions between the two countries before next month’s crucial visit of Premier Wen to New Delhi.  The talks come amid a row between the two countries on the issues of the stapled visas being issued by China to the residents of Jammu and Kashmir, presence of Chinese personnel building various projects in Pakistan-Occupied Kashmir (POK) and Beijing's plan to construct new nuclear power projects in Pakistan.  The issue of stapled visas has become a major irritant in bilateral ties as the recent refusal of visa to top Indian General B S Jaswal on the ground that he headed troops of Northern Command, which included Jammu and Kashmir, had provoked India to put on hold defence exchanges with China.  The row over stapled visas had been raised by External Affairs Minister S M  Krishna during his meeting with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jeichi on the sidelines of Russia, India, China (RIC) Ministers meeting at Wuhan in China on November 14.

http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/india-china-to-hold-crucial-border-talks-aheadwen%5Cs-visit/117393/on
Pak's annual defence exp may balloon to Rs 58,000 cr Press Trust of India / Islamabad November 27, 2010, 17:26 IST  Pakistan's annual expenditure could cross the budgeted allocation of Rs 442 billion and balloon to Rs 580 billion, according to a media report.  Pakistan's defence spending exceeded the budgetary limits for the first quarter of July-September.  The defence spending exceeded the budgetary limits for the first quarter by about Rs 28 billion because of the war on terror and the military's prolonged stay in the restive tribal belt bordering Afghanistan, a senior unnamed official told the Dawn newspaper.  The defence spending for July-September was estimated at Rs 89 billion but the finance ministry's provisional figures for the period put it at about Rs 117 billion, the official said.  The defence expenditure during the same period last year was about Rs 86 billion.  With this pace of spending, the annual defence expenditure could cross Rs 58,000 crore, against the Rs 55,200 crore estimated by the International Monetary Fund and the government's budgeted allocation of Rs 442 billion, the official said.  Higher than planned expenditure on defence and flood rescue and relief work and lower than estimated revenue collection in the first quarter has increased the quarterly fiscal deficit to 1.6 per cent from the budgeted target of 1.4 per cent of GDP, the official said.  The finance ministry asked ministries, divisions and all federal departments in August to limit their expenditures to 20 per cent of the approved budget during the first quarter of the fiscal year.  The finance ministry's guidelines for the current expenditure require all government agencies and ministries, including the offices of the President and Prime Minister, to keep expenditures at 20 per cent of the approved allocation for the first and second quarters of the fiscal year and 30 per cent in the third and fourth quarters, the official said.  The official said provisional data on fiscal operations had been shared with the IMF and would be made public by end of this month.

http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/pak%5Cs-annual-defence-exp-may-balloon-to-rs-58000-cr/117388/on
Adarsh scam: Key papers go missing Press Trust of India / Mumbai November 27, 2010, 13:57 IST  Key papers pertaining to the scam-ridden Adarsh housing society are missing from the Urban Development Department here, police said today.  Police have registered a case of theft after a secretary of the department, Gurudas Bajpe, gave a written complaint to the Marine Drive police last night about the missing documents.  "We have registered a case against unknown persons. According to the UD department officials, several papers from the 10 files on Adarsh society were missing," DCP Cherring Dorje said. The disappearance of the papers was brought to the notice of CBI, which is investigating the multi-crore scam.  "The department had submitted to us 10 files pertaining to Adarsh society. During perusal we realised that four noting papers were missing from the files. We brought this to the attention of the department," a senior CBI official said.  The papers include the remarks of the state government officials and chief minister, the official said.  "Investigations are on. We are questioning authorities of the Urban Development department," Dorje said.  The Adarsh society, originally meant to be a six-storey structure to house Kargil war heroes and war widows, was converted into a 31-storey building, violating a number of laws. The flats were allotted to bureaucrats, politicians' relatives and defence officers.

http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/adarsh-scam-key-papers-go-missing/117367/on
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http://imads.rediff.com/0/OasDefault/LB_KarnatakaTourism_Ros_01/KT_728x90.gif" WIDTH=728 HEIGHT=90 BORDER=0></A> Kashmir: Two militants killed in Kupwara November 27, 2010 19:14 IST Tags: Kupwara, Brar, PTI, north Kashmir, Handwara Share this Ask Users Write a Comment  Two militants were on Saturday killed in an encounter with army troops in Handwara area of north Kashmir's [ Images ] Kupwara district.  "Two militants have been killed in an operation at Mooldari in Handwara area of Kupwara district," Defence spokesman Lieutenant Colonel J S Brar told PTI, adding that two AK rifles were recovered from the scene of the gun-battle.  Brar said two major hideouts were also busted in the area. The identity and group affiliation of the slain militants could not be ascertained immediately as the search operations were still in progress, he said.  Meanwhile, security sources said an infiltration bid was foiled near the Line of Control [ Images ] in Trehgam sector of Kupwara district on Friday night. As the heavily-armed militants were challenged by army troops, the ultras opened indiscriminate firing, they said.  Security forces returned the fire, triggering off a fierce gun-battle, they said, adding the militants fled from the spot and crossed back to Pakistan-occupied Kashmir.  The militants left behind a huge quantity of weapons, ammunition and communication equipment, they added. © Copyright 2010 PTI. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PTI content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent.

http://www.rediff.com/news/report/two-militants-killed-in-kupwara/20101127.htm
‘Only 1% defence personnel involved in scams’  The three chief of India’s defence forces said corruptions cases involving defence personnel are few “black spots” and involve only a miniscule part of the forces.  In a combined visit on Saturday to their alma mater —the National Defence Academy — air chief marshal PV Naik, navy chief admiral Nirmal Verma and chief of the army staff general VK Singh asked cadets not to get “influence by such things”.  The service chiefs were responding to a query on what message they would like to give to cadets on some of the ongoing developments in the Adarsh Society scam, which involved defence officers.  “My message is not to get too influenced by these things. Only 1% of the people are involved,” Naik said without mentioning the scam. Earlier this year, the defence forces were embroiled in the Sukna land scam case.  Most of the senior army officials along with senior politicians and bureaucrats were found in possession of flats in Adarsh society. The flats were meant for families of Kargil war heroes.  Naik said: “In every strata of human endeavour, little bugs are there. No one is perfect and neither is the military.”  Reacting to the issue Singh said: “Some people do deviate, but those are miniscule lot of our part.”  The Naval chief, however, asked the media not to generalise the issue saying, “There may be some aberrations, but it’s a request to the media not to portray it as a norm.”

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Only-1-defence-personnel-involved-in-scams/Article1-631845.aspx
Indian Navy , Army and Air Force conduct joint training exercise in Visakhapatnam By Frontier India | November 27th, 2010 | Category: Indian Air Force News, Indian Army News, Indian Coast Guard and Para Military | No Comments »  Indian Navy and the Indian Air Force jointly conducted a training exercise in Visakhapatnam on Friday. The exercise aimed to strengthen the unified command. During the exercise, amphibian naval crafts moved heavy tanks and army trucks. The equipment has been modified to suit the amphibious warfare. A fleet of ships, with the INS Jalashwa in lead, conducted exercises to displaye the offensive and defensive capabilities of the Eastern Naval Fleet.  During the exercise, the defence forces exchanged visits to each others bases to learn about their strong and weak points.  There is an increasing trend in joint exercises. The Eastern Naval command contributes to the Joint Command at the Andaman and Nicobar islands.

http://frontierindia.net/indian-navy-army-and-air-force-conduct-joint-training-exercise-in-visakhapatnam
Delhi frustrated at incapacity to dictate to Rawalpindi Posted on November 26, 2010 by Akhbar Navees   i   3 Votes  Quantcast   Bharati analysts are full of frustration at the inability of Delhi to strike at Pakistan and neutralize its military capacity. The admission by another Bharati writer that “Rawalpindi is fully aware that India is nowhere near acquiring the conventional military capability to punish Pakistan” clearly describes the impotence of the Bharati defense establishment beset with corruption and and incompetence. The colossal failure of the Kevari and the LCA and the Armiral Gorshkov are classic cases on what Bharat should not be doing–throwing money and getting little for it. Various DRDO reports from the Bharati department of defense describe the failures and the impotence of the Tri-Coloreds to design or build defense equipment–in other words its a replay of the CWG.  After the impotence of Operation Parakarm destroyed by Pakistan’s Uzm e Nao, Bharat tried to play with Cold Start etc. Pakistani retaliated by perfecting small, medium-range and long range missiles which would put the brakes on Bharat’s rapid deployment units. Now Bharat denies having a Cold Start Strategy–even Stephen Cohen one of its authors eventually disowning it.  Unable to produce the Migs, Bharat then went on a buying spree–the only problem is that most of the jets ordered won’t be part of the IAF for a decade. In the meantime almost half of the IAF is grounded–the obsolete Migs add up to many planes, but very few combat-ready fighters. Thus the level of anger displayed by the DRDO, the Ministry of Defense and the Ministry of External Affiars. The “risen” Superpower does not have a capacity to intimidate its nemesis–and that a colossal loss of face in a tough neighborhood. So what does Bharat do to make up for its imminent eviction from Kabul–send terror squad to Pakistan  Raja Mohan has written an article dripping with irritation, letdown, resentment, setback, and vexation.  Rawalpindi is fully aware that India is nowhere near acquiring the conventional military capability to punish Pakistan. To deter the Pakistan army from facilitating future cross-border terror attacks, India needs to act on a range of fronts.  These include more purposeful modernisation of the armed forces to generate some military pressure against Rawalpindi and strengthening India’s nuclear arsenal which continues to lag behind that of Pakistan. India must also focus on building up a serious missile defence programme that can introduce some uncertainty into Rawalpindi’s strategic calculus.Finally, on the diplomatic front, India has had some success and a lot more frustration.  Delhi knows the limits to international pressure on Pakistan. Despite giving nearly $20 billion in civilian and military aid to Pakistan during the last decade, the US is still having trouble getting Pakistan to act against groups that directly target American troops in Afghanistan. It was logical then for India to find ways to directly engage Pakistan to bring the Mumbai plotters to book.  But all indications are that India is unlikely to get any satisfaction on terrorism from its current talks with Pakistan. Our interlocutors across the border have no control over the terror machine, which is run by the Pakistan army. The real challenge for India, then, is in finding ways to compel Rawalpindi to change its calculus of support for cross-border terrorism. This in turn means exploring Rawalpindi’s own weak points.  The ISI’s influence over the Pashtuns across its western frontiers is at the heart of Pakistan’s success in holding the international community hostage in Afghanistan. It is also potentially the weakest element of Rawalpindi’s strategy, for the Pashtuns, including the Taliban, have never recognised the legitimacy of the Durand Line that is supposed to be the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan. India must step up its engagement of the Pashtuns and put the question of the Durand Line’s future on the international agenda.  India must also begin to focus on Pakistan’s civil-military relations and step up its support for genuine democratic change. While Rawalpindi’s dominance over Pakistan’s polity is real, it is no reason why India should not make it a political issue. Further, Delhi must take a more disaggregated view of our neighbour.  Instead of negotiating with the civilian government that is sat upon by the army, India must consider a direct engagement with the political parties in Pakistan both at the federal and provincial level. Capacity-building holds the key to India’s progress in the areas of defence and deterrence against terrorism. That will take time, persistent effort and strong political leadership in Delhi. On the diplomatic front, India will have to continuously look for bold approaches to contain the Pakistan army. Indian Express. raja.mohan@expressindia.com  Raja Mohan is typical of Bharaits who have gotten caught iIn flagrante delicto over-reach. They have purchased Viagra pills in the shapes of Nuclear Subs which don’t have Nuclear power plants, hundreds of Migs that turned out be Flying Coffins, and Aircraft Carriers that don’t have planes.  Unable to defeat the Pakistan or wish it into oblivion, the huffed and puffed in 2001–marching their entire army to the Pakistani border, and then withdrawingin ignominous defeat. They huffed and puffed in 2009, but faced with “loss of Territoty”, the took the advice of the Bharati Army and did not try out any of the silliness that was tried in 2001.  Now they wish to place a wedge between the PPPP and the Army and resurrect old skeletons from the closet. Reaching far back into 1893 they want Afghanistan to talk about dead issues which even the US isn’t ready to touch.  Despite the bluster in Lisbon, the planet knows that the withdrawal of US and NATO forces will begin in 2011 and way before 2013.

http://rupeenews.com/2010/11/26/delhi-frustrated-at-incapacity-to-dictate-to-rawalpindi/
26/11: How India debated a war with Pakistan that November PranabDhalSamanta Posted online: Fri Nov 26 2010, 10:07 hrs New Delhi : The last of the 26/11 terrorists had been killed only a few hours back when Prime Minister Manmohan Singh presided over an urgently called meeting of the country’s security top brass. Present at that meeting on November 29, 2008, were Defence Minister A K Antony, the then National Security Advisor M K Narayanan, heads of both intelligence agencies and the three service chiefs — the Army was represented by its Vice-Chief Lt Gen M L Naidu as Army Chief Gen Deepak Kapoor was overseas — among other high-ranking officials. The key issue on the agenda — India’s response.  By then, there was no doubt among any of those present at this meeting, which lasted for over two hours at the PM’s residence, that the entire attack had been controlled, coordinated and plotted by the Lashkar-e-Toiba and its handlers in Pakistan. An undeniable body of evidence had already piled up from the calls monitored between the terrorists and their handlers in the course of the attack. More evidence was pouring in by the hour. There was no way any government in New Delhi could drag its feet — the Prime Minister knew he had to ask the dreaded question to all those responsible for the defence of India.  He started with the words that the people of India “will not forgive us” for what had happened and that the government had indeed failed them. This was not an empty comment. About 10 days before, US intelligence had intercepted a phone call from “somewhere in the Arabian Sea” to Pakistan-occupied-Kashmir. The input with coordinates of the boat’s position had been passed on to Indian agencies and then disseminated but not with the immediacy and urgency it deserved. Coast Guard authorities carried out reconnaissance sorties but by then it was too late. They found nothing on those coordinates except for scores of fishing boats that looked alike. The boat had obviously moved on. The Coast Guard filed a report that it needed the latest coordinates. And that’s where matters lay until the night of November 26 when the 10 terrorists surfaced in the heart of Mumbai.  Yet, the Prime Minister kept his calm and turned to the three service chiefs. He asked them whether they had any options in mind. In the same breath, he preemptively made it clear that he did not favour another Operation Parakram. That option was off the table from day one, recall sources. The then Navy Chief Admiral Sureesh Mehta chose to remain quiet. After all, the Navy was carrying out exercises in the area when the 10 terrorists slipped in without raising an alarm. The Army Vice-Chief wanted to wait for Gen Kapoor to return before they could crystallise their thoughts.  It was Air Chief Marshal Fali Major who eventually spoke up and suggested striking terror camps in PoK. The Air Chief was sure that his planes and pilots could do the job but the intelligence agencies would have to provide the coordinates. There was no further discussion on the subject that day, but it was also not the last conversation.  So, how close did India and Pakistan come to war? The views range from “very close” to “fleetingly close” but the fact which all key players confirm is that the military option was indeed on the table. It was subsumed by only a larger question of how would Pakistan react?  LIMITED STRIKES  IN the days that followed, the military top brass went aboutnworking on the options. The Air Force, in particular, did go into the finer aspects of conducting a limited air strike in PoK but the political decision-making never moved any further.  However, the Defence Minister did hold a meeting with the three service chiefs after the PM’s first meet. At that point, the Army Chief was asked whether limited ground strikes could be carried out. Gen Kapoor is said to have responded that an operation was possible but he would need a week’s notice and that it would be a “highly risky” affair. He is said to have added that any political approval on this must include flexibility for the Army to respond anywhere along the LoC or for that matter, even the international border. In the Army’s assessment, any strike would definitely lead to an escalated military conflict and the government ought to prepared for it. The Air Force agreed that a strong Pakistani reaction was certain but was not willing to predict the levels of escalation.  F-16 scramble  WhileHILE this continued, the Army proposed that it would like to prolong the stay of two of its brigades involved in a scheduled peacetime military exercise on the Rajasthan border. The go-ahead was given and the two brigades overstayed for about two weeks.  Much later, in early January, when then Foreign Secretary Shivshankar Menon, who is now the National Security Advisor, visited the US, his eloquent assertion in all his meetings about how India had not provoked Pakistan was only once challenged. Gen David Petraeus is learnt to have told him that this was not true because Indian troops had overstayed after finishing their military exercise. To Pakistan, he felt, this was a provocation to which it gave a disproportionate response by placing troops on alert and moving its fighters closer to the border.  There was also another incident about an Indian plane violating Pakistan airspace which apparently led to a F-16 scramble on the Pakistan side. Islamabad lodged a strong diplomatic protest. India denied with equal conviction. But at the same time the Air Force was asked to carry out an investigation.  The result was that there was indeed some violation by a reconnaissance plane of the Aviation Research Centre, RAW’s air wing, that was conducting a sortie along the LoC. This aircraft, perhaps, went too close to the LoC, violating the rule that both sides will not send their aircraft that near.  The n-threat  A few days later, a meeting was held in the nuclear bunker where the top leadership of the government is to be rushed in case of a nuclear strike. This was not provoked by 26/11. It was scheduled much before the attacks with the objective of familiarising the PM and other ministers of the emergency drill. But in the backdrop of the Mumbai attacks, the meeting could not have ignored the security environment of the day.  The PM is believed to have asked how would one distinguish a nuclear strike from any other non-nuclear, yet devastating attack. This was important because like many in the bunker, he too wanted to be sure that sufficient safeguards were in place to prevent a mistaken response. A long explanation was given. The PM then wanted to know if there was a chance Pakistan could misjudge a conventional strike by India and trigger a nuclear response.  There was near silence. Pakistan, by then, had already created “war hysteria” which many felt was unprovoked. The larger consensus was that you could not be sure about Pakistan’s response. It’s reliably learnt that it was this uncertainty which halted Indian strategists from fully backing any military response.  Under considerable pressure to show some response, the Prime Minister had independently tasked Menon to draw up a list of India’s options. Menon did carry out the exercise like a professional and gave an unsigned note that started with extreme measures like a limited military strike to less effective but dramatic steps like scaling down diplomatic relations, stopping cricketing ties, visa restrictions among others. He and Narayanan met regularly, at the PM’s instructions, to discuss the question of options in the days and weeks after the attacks.  Deniable option  In the wake of all the uncertainty over how Pakistan would respond, there was also talk about the “deniable option”. One which would involve covert operatives carrying out a sensational strike in Pakistan or in PoK. It’s learnt that RAW and the Army were specifically asked this question. RAW’s response to the NSA stunned all except, perhaps, Narayanan himself who is among the doyens of Indian intelligence. India’s premier external intelligence agency admitted that it had no assets in Pakistan to carry out such an action. It was explained that India lost all the meagre local support it had in pockets of Pakistan after the Babri Masjid attack and what little was left, was shut down by a prime ministerial diktat during I K Gujral’s tenure.  The Army said it had the ability to carry out commando operations but the government had to be clear what would be the approach if anyone was apprehended. Also, the Army let it be known that it was not sure how Pakistan would react if it found out.  This discussion headed nowhere after this because the ground realities were clear that India had consciously not cultivated this option. Some others felt it was pointless to discuss the “deniable option” because the whole idea of a response should be that the “other side” should know who did it.  Us role  JUST as Singh deliberated these issues here, on November 29 itself, then US President George W Bush held a meeting with his security advisors and also on the video link with his missions in India and Pakistan. He told them that the last time something like this happened in the United States, “we went to war”. Prime Minister Singh, he added, was also under immense pressure and that the United States must do all it can to help him so that he does not go to war.  That eased matters a bit as Bush made it clear to Pakistan that it needed to “roll up and crush” the terror outfit behind the attack. US assistance was unprecedented, forcing Pakistan to accept that the attack was carried out from its soil.  But when the dust settled, all agreed that the unpredictability on the Pakistan side and the fear that its decision makers could opt for a disproportionate response, including the nuclear option, stymied any possible chance of military action on India’s behalf after 26/11.  After the first two weeks following the attack, the question that overtook everyone’s mind was what if there is another terror strike? Would India be able to hold back then?  Two years later, when asked if that phase is now over, a high-ranking security official remarked: “I can’t say, but I think that the question is still as serious. Can we keep quiet if there is another Mumbai? No, this question is still relevant.”

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/26-11--How-India-debated-a-war-with-Pakistan-that-Nove

From Today's Papers - 27 Nov 2010






We are on brink of war: N Korea   *Blames US move to host military drill with S Korea  *S Korea names new defence minister *Anger grows in Seoul over handling of attack  Yeonpyeong/Seoul, Nov 26 North Korea warned today that US-South Korean plans for joint military drill have put the peninsula on the brink of war, and appeared to launch its own artillery drills within earshot of an island it showered with a deadly barrage this week.  disaster: A South Korean marine base housing its K-9 self-propelled guns burns after it was hit by North Korean artillery shells in this November 23 picture. disaster: A South Korean marine base housing its K-9 self-propelled guns burns after it was hit by North Korean artillery shells in this November 23 picture.   The fresh artillery blasts came just after the top US commander in South Korea, Gen Walter Sharp, toured the country's Yeonpyeong Island in a show of solidarity with Seoul and to survey damage from Tuesday’s hail of North Korean artillery fire that killed four persons.  “The situation on the Korean peninsula is inching closer to the brink of war due to the reckless plan of those trigger-happy elements to stage again war exercises targeted against the (North),” the North's official KCNA news agency said. Tensions have soared between the Koreas since the North’s strike Tuesday destroyed large parts of this island, killing two civilians as well as two marines in a major escalation of their sporadic skirmishes along the sea border. The heightened animosity between the Koreas is taking place as the North undergoes a delicate transition of power from leader Kim Jong Il to his young, inexperienced son Kim Jong Un, who is in his late 20s and is expected to eventually succeed his ailing father. Meanwhile, South Korea named a career soldier as its new defence minister on Friday amid mounting criticism of the government’s response to Tuesday’s attack by North Korea, its heaviest bombardment since the 1950-53 Korean War. The presidential Blue House appointed Kim Kwan-jin, 61, former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, to replace Kim Tae-young, who quit yesterday.  distress: People weep after offering their condolences at a memorial altar for two dead Marines at a hospital in south of Seoul. distress: People weep after offering their condolences at a memorial altar for two dead Marines at a hospital in south of Seoul. — Reuters  “(We) think nominee Kim, well-respected for professionalism and conviction, is the right person for the post in order to restore trust from people and boost morale in the entire military,” presidential secretary Hong Sang-pyo told a news briefing.  The United States is sending in an aircraft carrier group, led by the nuclear-powered USS George Washington, to the Yellow Sea for the military exercises with South Korea starting on Sunday.  Planned before this week's attack, the four-day manoeuvres are a show of strength which, besides enraging North Korea, have already unsettled China. There’s a growing anger among the people with some members of the government and Opposition lawmakers accused the military of responding too slowly. Hundreds of former South Korean soldiers held a protest rally in the border town of Paju on Friday. — Agencies  China’s fresh warning  Beijing warned on Friday against military acts near its coastline ahead of US-South Korean naval exercises.The military moves have unsettled N Korea and China, its only real ally. “We oppose any unilateral military act conducted in China's exclusive economic zone without approval," China's Foreign Ministry said in an online response to a question regarding China's position on the George Washington participating in joint naval exercises. The exclusive economic zone is a maritime zone up to 200 nautical miles from a country's coast. 

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2010/20101127/world.htm#1
Kasab should live, says 26/11 martyr's father  NDTV Correspondent, Updated: November 26, 2010 22:32 IST Ads by Google  Launching Lenovo V460 – Intel® Core™ i3 powered affordable Laptop for growing businesses.  www.lenovo-india.in/SME  PLAYClick to Expand & Play Mumbai:  On the second anniversary of the Mumbai terror attack the father of slain NSG commando Sandeep Unnikrishnan feels that Kasab should live.  "Last year when I was here I said that Kasab should die. This year I feel let Kasab live because it will strengthen our resolve to fight terrorism," said K Unnikrishnan.  Unnikrishnan was speaking after a cycle rally which was staged as a tribute to the martyrs of 26/11.  Asked further if Kasab should be tried again, K Unnikrishnan said there was no need for any trial and the talk of retrial is "absolutely absurd".      * Share this on Rediff.com Rediff.com     * NDTVTwitter     * NDTVNDTV Social     * Share with MessengerLive Messenger     * NDTVGmail Buzz     * NDTVPrint   Unnikrishnan however lamented the manner in which the political parties tried to hijack his effort. He was miffed at the fact that the rally was "politicised". (Watch)  His son Sandeep Unnikrishnan was an NSG commando who was killed during a shootout at the Taj on November 26, 2008. Kasab has already been awarded death sentence for his attempt of wage war against India.

http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/kasab-should-live-says-26-11-martyrs-father-68844
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http://imads.rediff.com/0/OasDefault/LB_LIC_02/pondlic728x90.jpg" WIDTH=728 HEIGHT=90 BORDER=0></a> '5 terror camps along LoC, Pak Army gives covering fire' November 26, 2010 22:54 IST Tags: Mohammad Saleem Rahmani, Pakistan Army, Keel, Nawab Shah Sindh, Abu Saad Share this Ask Users Write a Comment  About five launching pads are operating along the Line of Control [ Images ] where at least 50 terrorist are present at any given time ready to infiltrate, a foreign terrorist nabbed recently by security forces has revealed.  Mohammad Saleem Rahmani alias Abu Saad, hailing from Nawab Shah in Pakistan, said the camps were located at Chamb, Keel, Athmuqam and the Lepa Valley on the Pakistani side.  Rahmani said he 'infiltrated through the Keel sector and that the Pakistan Army allowed their group to cross the bridge after contacting their seniors.'  "The Pakistan Army helps the terrorists in infiltration by giving covering fire," he disclosed  A police spokesman said that the arrested foreign terrorist disclosed that 'potential jihadis of different conflict-ridden regions of the world converge at Muzaffarabad and after assessing the linguistic familiarity of the potential jihadis, they are sent to regions like Kashmir [ Images ], Chechnya and Afghanistan'.  Rahmani said he was 'indoctrinated at Masjid Ibrahim Khalil at Nawab Shah Sindh.  "The Masjid was sealed in the aftermath of 26/11, as the Mumbai [ Images ] attackers were motivated and indoctrinated there. This camp was reopened within two days of closure," he added.  He said that like other potential jihadis, he too was imparted training at Mansara district of Sarhad state of Pakistan.  "The basic training course runs for one month, which is known as Dor-e-Aam, during which basic training on the handling of weapons is provided besides religious indoctrination. Every week, 40 to 50 potential jihadis are imparted training at this camp. Nasar Javaid and Abu Saad were at the helm of affairs at the Mansara camp."  They were then shifted to Muzaffarabad for further rigorous training.  "This training period is known as Duri-e-Khas, which runs for 3 months during which field craft, battle tactics and shooting tactics are imparted. About 250 to 300 terrorists are present at this camp at any time." Mukhtar Ahmad in Srinagar

http://www.rediff.com/news/report/five-terror-camps-along-loc-pak-army-gives-help/20101126.htm
Navy, Air Force conduct joint training exercise in Visakhapatnam Source:ANI    Fri, Nov 26, 2010 at 21:50 Comments (0) Send to Mobile Print SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend Do you want $25.000 - to bring your idea to life? Take part in the Big Bang Challenge www.ideas4all.com Ads by Google  The Navy and the Air Force jointly conducted a training exercise here on Friday with the aim of strengthening the unified command of the Indian defence services.  The objective of the exercise was to give an opportunity to soldiers to learn about the capabilities and qualities of the other divisions of the armed forces.  As part of the exercise amphibian crafts performed various naval exercises. The equipments were modified to suit the geographical conditions of islands where heavy tanks and army trucks can move easily in deep water.  A fleet of ships, including the INS Jalashwa, conducted exercises to prove the offensive and defensive capabilities of the Eastern Fleet.  During training, all personnel visited each other's defence bases to learn about their strong and weak points.  "We are giving as much training as possible to our people because sometimes you have to take few people extra or rotate people around faster, and that's how you keep your personnel ready for it," said Karamveer Singh, a senior naval officer of the Eastern Naval Command.  "What we do is between the Coast Guard and the Navy, we time-share in terms of air assets. Patrolling can be done by air means like electronic surveillance and presence. Between these three methods and between Indian Navy and Coast Guard, you tend to withdraw," added Singh. (ANI)

http://sify.com/news/navy-air-force-conduct-joint-training-exercise-in-visakhapatnam-news-national-kl0vOehdghc.html
Boeing Offers CH-47 Chinook Heavy-lift Helicopters to Indian Army  Boeing, a leading American defense and aerospace company, has offered India the CH-47 Chinook heavy lift helicopters in response to a Ministry of Defence Request-for-Proposal (RFP) for 15 transport helicopters for the Indian Army.  Confirming exclusively to India Defence, Dr. Vivek Lall, Vice President, Boeing Defense, Space and Security, India said:  “We also responded to the RFP for 15 transport helicopters with our CH-47 Chinook. We believe the CH-47 Chinook offers India a powerful workhorse helicopter, as capable in supporting the Indian Army in rugged high-altitude outposts, as it will help build India’s infrastructure and bringing life-saving relief supplies to victims of natural disasters. Chinooks will offer India heavy-lift and high-altitude transportation for multitude of military, humanitarian, rescue, disaster relief, fire-fighting and nation-building missions in all climates and conditions and altitudes. They are ideally suited for India’s vast distances, austere environments and high altitudes.”  The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is a twin-engine, tandem rotor heavy-lift helicopter. Its top speed of 170 knots (196 mph, 315 km/h) was faster than contemporary utility and attack helicopters of the 1960s. It is one of the few aircraft of that era that is still in production and front line service with over 1,179 built to date.  Its primary roles include troop movement, artillery emplacement and battlefield resupply. It has a wide loading ramp at the rear of the fuselage and three external-cargo hooks. Chinooks have been sold to 16 nations with the US Army and the Royal Air Force being the largest users and it has seen action in the Vietnam war, Iran-Iraq war, Falklands war and is currently in operation in Iraq and Afghanistan.

http://www.pakpasban.com/2010/11/boeing-offers-ch-47-chinook-heavy-lift-helicopters-to-indian-army/


Friday, 26 November 2010

From Today's Papers - 26 Nov 2010





‘Reduntant’ Defence Estates Dept may be disbanded Tribune News Service  New Delhi, November 25 In a stinging retort on the functioning of the Defence Estates Department, an in-house study of the Ministry of Defence has said that the department “had very limited utility” and suggested its disbanding. Defence Minister AK Antony yesterday told Parliament that the Controller General of Defence Accounts had asked the Controller of Defence Accounts to carry out a special performance audit to examine the existing land acquisition system and the report had been received.  The report says: “The Ministry may like to order a comprehensive study for disbanding the organisation in a phased manner.”

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2010/20101126/nation.htm#4
Nuclear capable  Agni missile test-fired   Balasore (Orissa), Nov 25 India's nuclear-capable Agni-I strategic ballistic missile, which has a  striking range of 700 km, was successfully test-fired by the Army during a user trial from the Integ-rated Test Range at Wheeler Island off Orissa  coast today.  "The trial of Agni-I was smooth and the test flight was fully successful," ITR Director SP Dash said.  The indigenously developed surface-to-surface single-stage missile, powered by solid propellants, was test-fired from a rail mobile launcher around 1010 hours from launch pad-4 of ITR, 100 km off Orissa coast, defence sources said, adding "all parameters were met during the trial".  User of the missile -- the Strategic Force Command (SFC) of the Indian Army -- as part of their training exercise, executed the entire launch operation with the logistic support provided by the Defence Research Development Organisation (DRDO) at the ITR, said a DRDO official.  The missile has a highly specialised navigation system, which ensures it reaches the target  with a high degree of accuracy, he said.  The entire trajectory of the missile was tracked by sophisticated radars  and electro-optic telemetry stations located along the sea coast and two ships positioned near the impact point in the downrange area.  Weighing 12 tonne, the 15-metre-long Agni-I, which can carry payloads up to 1,000 kg, has already been inducted into the Indian Army. — PTI

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2010/20101126/nation.htm#10
North Korea warns of new attacks for Seoul 'provocations' Reuters / Seoul November 25, 2010, 8:42 IST  North Korea warned of additional military attacks if South Korea makes "reckless military provocations again," its official media said on Thursday.  "(North Korea) will wage second and even third rounds of attacks without any hesitation, if warmongers in South Korea make reckless military provocations again," the North's KCNA news agency quoted a statement from Pyongyang's military as saying.

http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/north-korea-warnsnew-attacks-for-seoul-%5Cprovocations%5C/117116/on
Look beyond Rawalpindi C. Raja Mohan Posted online: Fri Nov 26 2010, 03:45 hrs Two years after the pre-meditated and outrageous attack on Mumbai, India’s vulnerabilities to cross-border terrorism remain acute as ever. Despite overwhelming evidence that the aggression was planned and executed from Pakistan in collaboration with its state institutions, there is little hope that Islamabad will bring the perpetrators to justice. There is even less of a prospect that Pakistan might give credible assurances that its soil will not be used to launch future attacks on India. Delhi’s security managers can surely pat themselves on the back for being vigilant in preventing a major incident after 26/11. But the next attack might not be too far away. Much work remains to be done on all three dimensions of an effective counter-terror strategy — defence, deterrence and diplomacy. Defence is about preventing acts of terror through better acquisition and assessment of intelligence and effectively dealing with the attack when it does take place. India’s handling of 26/11 exposed the pitiful state of India’s capabilities on both these fronts. P. Chidambaram, who took charge of internal security in November 2008 itself, was quick to begin long overdue reforms. These included the passing of new anti-terror legislation, the setting up of the National Investigative Agency, establishing multi-agency centres at the national and state levels to better integrate and assess the available intelligence leads, and unveiling plans for the modernisation of the National Security Guard and improving coastal security. While it marked a good beginning, there is no doubt that the effort to reform India’s internal security structures has stalled. India’s police personnel remain poorly equipped, under-manned and ill-trained to deal with the expansive challenge of terrorism. If most state governments have refused to rise to the challenge, the Central government has been hampered by bureaucratic battles for turf and political doubts in the ruling party about security sector reform. The second element of our counter-terror strategy is deterrence. Ever since Pakistan acquired nuclear weapons, India has had few options for punitive retaliatory actions against Rawalpindi’s support for cross-border terror. Since it was surprised by Pakistan’s Kargil aggression in the summer of 1999, the Indian military establishment has struggled to break out of this box.Delhi’s talk about a “cold start” doctrine — that might let India conduct conventional military operations below the threshold of nuclear escalation — did draw a lot of concern from across the border and beyond. The Pakistan army headquarters in Rawalpindi is fully aware that India is nowhere near acquiring the conventional military capability to punish Pakistan. To deter the Pakistan army from facilitating future cross-border terror attacks, India needs to act on a range of fronts. These include more purposeful modernisation of the armed forces to generate some military pressure against Rawalpindi and strengthening India’s nuclear arsenal which continues to lag behind that of Pakistan. India must also focus on building up a serious missile defence programme that can introduce some uncertainty into Rawalpindi’s strategic calculus.Finally, on the diplomatic front, India has had some success and a lot more frustration. The evidence from 26/11 has helped India convince the international community to recognise the sources of terrorism in Pakistan. It has also opened the door for more substantive counter-terror cooperation with the United States. During his visit to Delhi earlier this month, American President Barack Obama called on Pakistan to shut down the terror networks on its territory, including the Lashkar-e-Toiba. British Prime Minister David Cameron travelling in India a few months earlier was more direct in stating the truth about Rawalpindi’s support for terror groups. Yet, Delhi knows the limits to international pressure on Pakistan. Despite giving nearly $20 billion in civilian and military aid to Pakistan during the last decade, the US is still having trouble getting Pakistan to act against groups that directly target American troops in Afghanistan. It was logical then for India to find ways to directly engage Pakistan to bring the Mumbai plotters to book. But all indications are that India is unlikely to get any satisfaction on terrorism from its current talks with Pakistan. Our interlocutors across the border have no control over the terror machine, which is run by the Pakistan army. The real challenge for India, then, is in finding ways to compel Rawalpindi to change its calculus of support for cross-border terrorism. This in turn means exploring Rawalpindi’s own weak points.The ISI’s influence over the Pashtuns across its western frontiers is at the heart of Pakistan’s success in holding the international community hostage in Afghanistan. It is also potentially the weakest element of Rawalpindi’s strategy, for the Pashtuns, including the Taliban, have never recognised the legitimacy of the Durand Line that is supposed to be the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan. India must step up its engagement of the Pashtuns and put the question of the Durand Line’s future on the international agenda.India must also begin to focus on Pakistan’s civil-military relations and step up its support for genuine democratic change. While Rawalpindi’s dominance over Pakistan’s polity is real, it is no reason why India should not make it a political issue. Further, Delhi must take a more disaggregated view of our neighbour. Instead of negotiating with the civilian government that is sat upon by the army, India must consider a direct engagement with the political parties in Pakistan both at the federal and provincial level. Capacity-building holds the key to India’s progress in the areas of defence and deterrence against terrorism. That will take time, persistent effort and strong political leadership in Delhi. On the diplomatic front, India will have to continuously look for bold approaches to contain the Pakistan army, the main support base for cross-border terrorism against India.

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/Look-beyond-Rawalpindi/716250
Delhi HC slams army''s policy on posting of injured personnel  New Delhi, Nov 25 (PTI) The Delhi High Court has slammed as "grossly deficient" the central government''s policy on posting of military personnel who have suffered injuries during the course of duty and asked the Indian Army not to transfer them frequently. Saying that the government is unable to effect meaningful postings of such persons, the court suggested the Indian Army to deploy them in peace areas to rehabilitate them and avail of their service. The court was hearing a petition filed by one Vinod seeking a direction to the Army not to transfer him from Delhi as he lost his fingers due to frostbite during the course of duty in Siachen. "The existing policy or working of any policy which may be in existence is shown to be grossly deficient in ensuring justice to such personnel", said a division bench of Justice Gita Mittal and J R Midha recently. "The importance of these issues which are necessary not only for rehabilitation of injured personnel in the service but also essential for ensuring a sense of justice to the personnel serving in the armed forces of the nation", the bench said. "It has been brought to our notice that there are several positions and assignments in the service where such personnel can be effectively and usefully deployed while at the same time ensuring continuity of a posting so that they are not required to shift periodically," the court added. Pointing to inaction on part of the government despite several observations passed earlier in similar issues, the court asked Atul Nanda, Standing Counsel of the Union of India, to bring it to the notice of the Defence Ministry for proper implementation of the existing policies. Rejecting the government stand that wounded personnel cannot be posted at any particular place beyond a length of time, the court suggested the government consider a policy for inter-corps transfer so that injured personnel can be placed at a post where longer tenures may be possible.

http://news.in.msn.com/national/article.aspx?cp-documentid=4627463
Indian MoD comments various defence and security issues   15:19 GMT, November 25, 2010 According to the Indian Press Information Bureau, the following information was recently given by Indian Defence Minister, Shri AK Antony in written replies to members of the Parliament of India:   Delay in Joint Defence Projects with Russia  The induction of aircraft carrier – Gorshkov/Vikramaditya has been delayed due to requirement of additional works and change in the scope of trials. The additional works will increase the service life of the aircraft carrier significantly. The delivery of the aircraft carrier has been rescheduled for December, 2012.  The procurement of modern weapon systems is undertaken as per the approved requirements of the Armed Forces in terms of capabilities sought and time frame prescribed, from various indigenous as well as foreign sources, including Russia, in accordance with the Defence Procurement Procedure.   Action Against Black Listed Israeli Company  CBI had registered a case against Shri Sudipta Gosh, former DGOF and some others in May, 2009 regarding receipt of illegal gratification from some suppliers of Ordnance Factories. After examining the FIR lodged by CBI, the Ministry of Defence had decided to put on hold all contracts with the companies involved in the CBI case, in its order dated May 28, 2009. The above order was challenged by some of the companies before the Delhi High Court. The High Court after hearing both sides set aside the order in its judgement dated February 11, 2010 directing that penal action against the companies can be taken only after following the principles of natural justice. Accordingly, show cause notices were issued to all the companies based on the contents of the FIR lodged by CBI. Replies were submitted by the companies denying the allegations and seeking specific evidence based on which penal action was proposed against them. When the information was sought from CBI, they informed that the charge sheet in the case will soon be filed.  After the charge sheet was field, the advice of the CVC was sought on the action to be taken. After considering CVC’s advice, it has been decided to issue fresh show cause notices to the companies based on the contents of the charge sheet. A decision regarding penal action will be taken after examining the replies of the companies and in consultation with the Ministry of Law.   Corruption in Defence Deals with Israel  Procurement of Defence equipment/weapon systems is done from various indigenous as well as foreign sources, including Israel, in accordance with the provisions of Defence Procurement Procedure. The said Procedure contains stringent provisions aimed at ensuring the highest degree of probity, public accountability, transparency and safeguarding the integrity of the Indian Defence procurement process.  Irregularities in respect of some Israeli Defence companies have come to notice and appropriate restrictions have been placed on dealing with these companies.   Obsolete Defence Equipment  Modernization and upgradation of its equipment by the Indian Air Force is a continuous process. This is done keeping in view the threat perceptions before the country. Government is seized of the threats facing the country and is fully prepared to meet all challenges.  The Navy and the Army also have equipment which has a prescribed life. Hence, there is life cycle based inventory management approach that is followed. Accordingly, acquisition is an ongoing process.

http://www.defpro.com/news/details/19996/?SID=b1368b7690f47303d2c3acd2bb2359c5


Thursday, 25 November 2010

From Today's Papers - 25 Nov 2010






Debate over US AfPak policy Focus shifts to Kabul’s security forces by G. Parthasarathy  At a meeting at the White House “Situation Room” on October 26, 2009, attended by his top security advisers, including Defence Secretary Robert Gates, President Obama indicated that while he was willing to approve of a short-term increase in American force levels in Afghanistan, he also wanted a “realistic ramp down” of troops to an “equilibrium that is manageable” and a “better described closure” of the US war effort in Afghanistan. Rejecting calls for a prolonged counter-insurgency in Afghanistan, the President concluded the meeting with the words: “I want an exit strategy”. In his speech in New York in December 2009, Obama made it clear that he wanted a drawdown in American troop levels to commence in July 2011 and that he expected a progressive handing over of counter-insurgency responsibilities to the Afghan National Army.  President Obama’s policy led to the Taliban leadership concluding that, with the date for the commencement of withdrawal of American forces set, the Karzai government in Kabul would get demoralised and that, like the Soviet Union, the Americans would soon quit Afghanistan defeated by a group of radical Islamists. America’s NATO allies also readied to pack their bags to quit Afghanistan. The ISI was delighted at the prospect of yet again converting Afghanistan into a client state and demanded that they should be involved in any talks on “national reconciliation” between the Karzai government and the Taliban.  The Obama administration then received a rude shock when Faisal Shahzad, an American national of Pakistani origin, attempted to blow up the Times Square in New York after being trained in Taliban strongholds in the tribal areas of Pakistan, straddling the Pakistan-Afghan border. Moreover, in several rounds of talks with Taliban representatives, in which top Taliban leaders like Mullah Omar and Sirajuddin Haqqani declined to participate, it has become clear that far from agreeing to abide by the Afghan Constitution, the Taliban leadership has no intention of scaling down its demand for an immediate and unconditional American withdrawal.  With the Republicans now controlling the House of Representatives, President Obama will find it difficult to advocate any strategy that leads to an ignominious US exit from Afghanistan, especially when the badlands along the AfPak borders remain as breeding grounds for international terrorism and a launching pad for attacks on the American homeland. Amidst these developments the Obama administration has given high-level access to a bipartisan “Task Force” of the Council for Foreign Relations (CFR), co-chaired by Clinton Administration NSA Sandy Berger and Bush Administration Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, to prepare and publish a report on the future AfPak policy. This report will constitute an important input for future AfPak policies which India should take careful note of.  The CFR Task Force defines the American objective in Pakistan thus: “To degrade and defeat terrorist groups that threaten American interests from its (Pakistan’s) territory and to prevent turmoil that would imperil the Pakistan state and risk the security of Pakistan’s nuclear programme”. American policy in Afghanistan is to be geared to “preventing the country from becoming a terrorist base that threatens the US and its allies” and to “diminish the potential that Afghanistan reverts to civil war”.  The usual incentives for Pakistan, which have failed in the past to change its orientation towards jihadi groups, are advocated. These include preferential market access, participation in G-20 discussions and increased economic and technical assistance. The report speaks of making it clear that American assistance is conditional on action by the Pakistan government against the Lashkar-e-Toiba (LeT), the Afghan Taliban, the Haqqani group and related terrorist groups.  The report, however, notes that things may change if there is a terrorist strike on the US, in which case attacks on terrorist strongholds will become inevitable. It also notes that if Pakistan does not change its relations with groups like the LeT and the Afghan Taliban, “frustration could cause the US to shift its approach towards Pakistan. It could then resort to a policy of carrot and stick by cutting military and economic assistance and getting the IMF to do likewise”. It also advocates that in these circumstances, the US may pursue closer ties with India at Pakistan’s expense.  The debate within the Obama administration over a withdrawal schedule from Afghanistan has been intense. Shortly after President Obama announced a commencement of withdrawal in July 2011, Defence Secretary Robert Gates told the US Congress that what the President had said was “the beginning of a process and not the end of a process”. He added: “I have adamantly opposed deadlines. I opposed them in Iraq and I oppose deadlines in Afghanistan”. But both Gates and Hillary Clinton have now indicated that they hope to transfer combat responsibilities to the Afghan security forces in 2014 — a measure which has been endorsed by America’s NATO allies.  It remains to be seen whether the NATO-trained Afghan security forces can undertake this role in 2014. But it is clear that earlier expectations that they could do so in 2011 have not been met. The most encouraging development has been the growing Russian readiness to increase its profile in Afghanistan, both in the supply of military equipment and the training of Afghan forces. Moreover, American and Russian drug enforcement agencies recently cooperated actively in destroying narcotics production facilities along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. Russia is making its transportation networks and airspace more easily available to the US.  The task force astonishingly advocates seeking Chinese cooperation to get Pakistan to act against terrorist groups like the LeT and the Afghan Taliban. It overlooks the fact that for over two years China blocked efforts in the UN Security Council to get the Jamat-ud-Dawa (another name for the LeT) banned as an international terrorist organization. Moreover, Pakistan has, in the past, facilitated Chinese contacts with the Taliban and Hekmatyar’s Hizb-e-Islami. Significantly, ISI-backed groups have never attacked Chinese interests in Afghanistan. It thus appears that the Obama administration will have to move towards continuing its military role in Afghanistan, at least till the end of 2014.  But American policies on Pakistan are destined to flounder, as they are based on seriously flawed premises. The Americans refuse to acknowledge that Pakistani support for terrorism is not the work of “elements” in the ISI, but constitute the considered decisions of the entire Pakistani Army establishment. It is not the fear of India, but the fear of Pashtun nationalism and a revival of Afghan territorial claims over the Durand Line that drive the Pakistani military’s efforts to convert Afghanistan into a medieval, isolated and extremist client state, which is shunned by the international community.

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2010/20101125/edit.htm#4
US aircraft carrier heads for Korean waters The United States and Japan urged China to do more to rein in North Korea after the reclusive nation fired scores of artillery shells on Tuesday at a South Korean island near the maritime boundary between the two sides. Source : Reuters   Wed, Nov 24, 2010 16:50:29 IST Views: 13    Comments: 0 Rate:  1 out of 5 2 out of 5 3 out of 5 4 out of 5 5 out of 5 0.0 / 0 votes   A U.S aircraft carrier group set off for Korean waters on Wednesday, a day after North Korea shelled a South Korean island, in a move likely to enrage Pyongyang and unsettle its ally, China.  The nuclear-powered USS George Washington, which carries 75 warplanes and has a crew of over 6,000, left a naval base south of Tokyo and would join exercises with South Korea from Sunday to the following Wednesday, U.S. officials in Seoul said.   "This exercise is defensive in nature," U.S. Forces Korea said in a statement. "While planned well before yesterday's unprovoked artillery attack, it demonstrates the strength of the ROK (South Korea)-U.S. alliance and our commitment to regional stability through deterrence."   North Korea said Seoul was driving the peninsula to the "brink of war" with "reckless military provocation" and by postponing humanitarian aid, the North's official KCNA news agency said. The dispatch did not refer to the planned military drills.   The United States and Japan urged China to do more to rein in North Korea after the reclusive nation fired scores of artillery shells on Tuesday at a South Korean island near the maritime boundary between the two sides.   The Seoul government said two South Korean civilians and two soldiers were killed and houses set ablaze in the attack, the heaviest in the region since the Korean War ended in 1953.   Beijing will not be pleased by the deployment of the aircraft carrier and will not respond to such pressure, said Xu Guangyu, a retired major-general in the People's Liberation Army who now works for a government-run arms control organisation.   "China will not welcome the U.S. aircraft carrier joining the exercises, because that kind of move can escalate tensions and not relieve them," he said.   "Our biggest objective is stability on the Korean peninsula. That interest is not served by abandoning North Korea, and so there's no need to rethink the basics of the relationship."   Beijing has previously said an earlier plan to send the USS George Washington to U.S.-South Korea joint exercises threatened long-term damage to Sino-U.S. relations.   Tuesday's bombardment nagged at global markets, already unsettled by worries over Ireland's debt problem and looking to invest in less risky assets. But South Korea's markets, after sharp falls, recovered lost ground.   "If you look back at the last five years when we've had scares, they were all seen as buying opportunities. The rule among hedge funds and long-only funds is that you let the market sell off and watch for your entry point to get involved," said Todd Martin, Asia equity strategist with Societe Generale in Hong Kong.   SEOUL CALM   Pyongyang said the firing was in reaction to military drills conducted by South Korea in the area at the time but Seoul said it had not been firing at the North.   Seoul, a city of over 10 million, was bustling as normal on Wednesday, a sunny autumn day, although developments were being closely watched by office workers on TV and in newspapers.   Editorials stepped up pressure on President Lee Myung-bak to respond more toughly than he has to past provocations by the North and two small groups held anti-North Korea protests.   President Barack Obama, woken up in the early hours to be told of the artillery strike, said he was outraged and pressed the North to stop its provocative actions.   Although U.S. officials said the joint exercise was scheduled before the attack by North Korea, it was reminiscent of a crisis in 1996 when the then President Bill Clinton sent an aircraft carrier group through the Taiwan Strait after Beijing test-fired missiles into the channel between the mainland and Taiwan.   "We're in a semi state of war," South Korean coastguard Kim Dong-jin told Reuters in the port city of Incheon where many residents of Yeonpyeong island fled in panic as the bombardment triggered a fire storm.   "My house was burned to the ground," said Cho Soon-ae, 47, who was among 170 or so evacuated from Yeonpyeong on Wednesday.   "We've lost everything," she said weeping, holding on to her sixth-grade daughter, as she landed at Incheon.

http://www.merinews.com/article/us-aircraft-carrier-heads-for-korean-waters/15835988.shtml
India to built two test ranges of electronic warfare systems Press Trust of India / Bangalore November 24, 2010, 14:43 IST  India would build two ranges for testing radar-based electronic warfare systems as it seeks to strengthen its capability in the field, seen to be vital in war scenarios.  One range would come up in Chitradurga in Karnataka and another in Tandur in Andhra Pradesh, which would test "non-communication" and "communication" EW systems, respectively, a key defence official said today.  These two would be part of the 4,000-acre aeronautical test range in Chitradurga, some 200 km from here, and the 8,000-acre one in Tandur, some 135 km from Hyderabad. At present, EW systems are tested in the IAF range in Gwalior in a limited way.  Once the two new testing ranges (in Chitradurga and Tandur) are operational in 2012-13, experimental and R&D tests can be conducted, said Prahlada, Chief Controller, R&D (Ae & SI), Defence Research and Development Organisation.  Speaking at the India National Electronic Warfare Workshop (EWWI-2010), he said an investment of Rs 200 crore each is expected in the two test ranges.  "Electronic Warfare is becoming a very important area because... You may have all weapons but if somebody jams you (the weapons), you are as good as useless. Before firing the missile, you are already decimated," he said.  "Without electronic warfare, you cannot win a war. Once you have it (EW capability), you have to test it, you can't wait for a war to test it," Prahlada said.  He said the present EW systems have been integrated with MiG-27 fighters and operational flights are slated next year. They would be integrated with MiG-29 fighters and the light combat aircraft next year.  In 2012, Prahlada said India would fly a fourth-generational EW system, which is being developed by Defence Avionics Research Establishment and Defence Electronics Research Laboratory.  He also said the flight-testing of the long-range surface-to-air missile, being jointly developed by India and Israel, would start next year. Ground-testing has just been completed.  Prahlada said DRDO was completely off the US entities list and it is a "big relief". Now US industries were free to do business with India, he said.  DRDO now can source raw materials, software packages, testing equipment, components and manufacturing process machinery, which was a difficult exercise when sanctions were in place.  During times of sanctions, it was also difficult to source such items from even countries such as UK and Germany because they were "aligned" with the US, resulting in some of the DRDO projects being delayed.  Prahlada also said DRDO was expecting a budget of Rs 9,000 crore in 2011-12 in the area of strategic systems and tactical defence.

http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/india-to-built-two-test-rangeselectronic-warfare-systems/117030/on
ndia to develop electronic warfare system soon 2010-11-25 00:00:00 HDFC Bank Personal Loan Ads by Google Hassle Free + Quick Approval + Low EMI*.Check Your Eligibility Online! hdfcbanksmartapply.com/personalloan  Bangalore, Nov 24 (IANS) India is developing its own radar-based electronic warfare system (EWS) with two test ranges in Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh to equip its armed forces for modern wars, a senior defence official said Wednesday.  'An indigenously developed radar-based EWS will be ready by 2013, with test ranges at Chitradurga in Karnataka and at Tandur near Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh,' state-run Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) chief controller Prahlada said here.  Cost of each test range is estimated to be about Rs.200 crore.  Noting that modern day wars cannot be fought and won without EWS, Prahlada said the radar-based sophisticated communication system would use electromagnetic spectrum for attack, protection and warfare support to destroy the combat capabilities of an enemy.  'The prowess of electronic warfare system was amply demonstrated by the US armed forces in Iraq and Afghanistan. A prototype EWS has been integrated with MiG-27 fighter for test flights,' Prahlada said at the first India National Electronic Warfare workshop, organised by the India chapter of Association of Old Crows (AOC), based at Virginia in the US.  The Chitradurga aeronautical test range, which will come up by 2012 at the DRDO's 4,000-acre campus in the state, about 200 km from Bangalore, will be used for communication-based EWS and the Tandur range will be used for non-communication EWS.  'The testing centres will be operational by 2012. As per the plan, EWS will be integrated with MiG-29, Jaguar, Sukhoi-MKI-30 of the Indian Air Force (IAF) and the indigenous Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) Tejas by 2011,' Prahlada told about 300 delegates.  'Our goal is to develop the fourth-generation EWS by 2012 because without electronic warfare, you cannot win a war. Once you have it (EW capability), you have to test it, you can't wait for a war to test it,' Prahlada added.  The fourth-generation EWS is being developed by the state-run Defence Avionics Research Establishment (DARE) and Defence Electronics Research Laboratory (DERL).  Once the air version of EWS is integrated and operational, the naval and army versions will be developed simultaneously.  Currently, EW systems are being tested in the IAF range at Gwalior in central India.  Stressing on greater self-reliance in production and procurement, the defence scientist said the country's defence research and development (R&D) establishments have been able meet about 50 percent of defence requirements indigenously and the target was to scale it up to 70 percent by 2020.

http://sify.com/news/india-to-develop-electronic-warfare-system-soon-news-national-klzaagbbajb.html
DRDO plans a slew of high-profile launches by December Debabrata Mohanty Posted online: Wed Nov 24 2010, 13:44 hrs Bhubaneswar : Two months after its embarrassing failure in the test firing of nuclear-weapons capable, surface-to-surface Prithvi-II ballistic missile from Chandipur in Orissa, the Defence Research Development Organisation officials are planning a slew of high-profile missile launches before the year ends.  On September 24, the Prithvi-II missile with a maximum range of 350 km dropped off a few seconds after it was fired from a mobile launcher from Integrated Test Range in Chandipur-on-sea of Orissa. DRDO so far has been silent on the failure on the missile which has been inducted into the Army.  DRDO sources said that on November 25, the nuclear-capable and surface-to-surface single stage Agni-I missile would be test-fired by personnel of the Strategic Forces Command as part of Indian Army's user-training exercise from Wheeler Island on Bay of Bengal. The missile was last successfully test-fired on March 28. Like Prithvi-II, Agni-I has also been inducted into the Army. The missile which has a range of 700 km, can carry payloads weighing up to 1000 kg. Agni-1, with its rail and road mobility can target most cities in Pakistan without having to be launched from the border. Agni-I is designed to bridge the gap between indigenously built short-range Prithvi, already deployed in the Army, and medium range Agni-II, that has a range of more than 2,000 km.  On December 2, DRDO would test-fire supersonic cruise missile Brahmos that has a range of 290 kms. It was last tested successfully on September 5.  Similarly, the 2,000 km plus range surface-to-surface nuclear-capable missile Agni-II would be test-fired from Wheeler Island between December 8 and 12. The missile was last tested successfully on May 17 this year after two successive failures last year. The 20-metre long Agni-II is a two stage, solid-propelled ballistic missile. It has a launch weight of 17 tonnes and can carry a payload of 1000 kg over a distance of 2000 km. In February this year, the 3,500-km plus range Agni-III was also successfully test-fired.

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/drdo-plans-a-slew-of-highprofile-launches-by-december/715330/
British Defence Secretary visits India   08:51 GMT, November 24, 2010 The UK's Defence Secretary Dr Liam Fox has met with the Indian Defence Minister Shri A K Antony during a two-day visit to New Delhi.  Dr Fox is the first UK Defence Secretary to visit India since 2005 and took the opportunity to give a speech to some of the country's top security officials at the Vivekananda International Foundation.  Dr Fox explained the importance of the strategic partnership between the UK and India and reiterated the UK's determination to deepen the already excellent defence relations between them.  The core aim of the visit was to begin a regular ministerial dialogue on a wide range of defence issues, engagement that will continue in the coming months. Dr Fox said: "The United Kingdom is committed to an enhanced partnership with India - one that celebrates and recognises India's position as a central player in contemporary world affairs. Our two countries have long historical connections and strong ties between our people.  "We have overlapping interests in trade and in security, which are a strong basis for our future relationship. The new British Government supports the promotion of a stronger, secure and more prosperous India playing its rightful role in global affairs."  During his visit, Dr Fox laid a wreath at India Gate as a mark of respect for fallen servicemen before visiting the New Delhi offices of defence company Cassidian to discuss and promote the Eurofighter Typhoon's bid to provide aircraft to the Indian Air Force.  Dr Fox spoke to Shri A K Antony about opportunities for the UK and Indian Armed Forces to work together more closely following on from the successful joint air exercise 'Indra Dhanush' last month and the recent company-level exercise 'Shamsheer Bugle' which was the first exercise involving a British Army unit in India in over 60 years.  Dr Fox added: "During Exercise Shamsheer Bugle, companies from the UK's 4 RIFLES [4th Battalion The Rifles] and India's 18th Battalion Sikh Regiment shared experience in counter-insurgency operations. We are keen to share the experience we have gained in operations in Afghanistan and hope to host an Indian Army company in the UK next year. We want to accelerate the bilateral programme of exercises, exchanges, training and equipment co-operation wherever we can."

http://www.defpro.com/news/details/19941/?SID=f95236845a894ba621e4bf8d33cbbfab
India deploys new border divisions to counter massive Chinese advantages  (TibetanReview.net, Nov24, 2010) As China’s belligerence in terms of Kashmir policy and claim over Arunachal Pradesh grows despite increased bilateral trade relations and common interests in climate and trade talks at global forums, India is stepping up its efforts to strengthen its border security. It has now deployed two new army divisions – comprising more than 36,000 men – to defend its north-eastern state of Arunachal Pradesh.  Apart from adopting a new policy of regarding Kashmir as a disputed territory, China recently took to calling Arunachal Pradesh as southern Tibet to strengthen its territorial assertion over the state.  The Times of India Nov 23 cited Indian Defence ministry officials as saying the two infantry mountain divisions included 1260 officers and 35011 soldiers, and that it will be fully “operational with specialized equipment” by 2011.  Similarly, the first battalion of Arunachal Scouts, a paramilitary force, will be up and running by May 2011. A Sikkim Scouts will also be set up. The two mountain-fit, son-of-the-soil forces will help the army protect the Sino-Indian border in the two states.  BBC News online Nov 23 said the new, 56th Division will be based in the nearby state of Nagaland to guard the eastern flank of Arunachal Pradesh from Chinese attack through Burma. The other new formation, the 71st Division, will be based in Assam to protect central Arunachal Pradesh.  Already the Indian Fifth Mountain Division guards western Arunachal Pradesh while another division is responsible for protecting the eastern part of the state.  The report cited a staff officer with the Indian Army Chief General VK Singh, who pushed very hard for the new divisions, as saying the new formation was India's response to the "huge Chinese build-up" in Tibet over the last three to four years.  India has also cited China’s "superb" communications system, especially after the completion of the Lhasa train line in 2006, and its far superior airlift capability as reasons for the border-strengthening moves.  The BBC report said the formation of the two new divisions means that India's deployments in the eastern sector of its border with Chinese ruled Tibet now matches the five army divisions that existed in 1986-87, when the two countries nearly went to war. It added that’s both the sides scaled down their deployments after they signed a "Peace and Tranquillity" treaty in 1993 as part of a confidence-building package.  Chinese reaction While China is yet to officially react to the Indian move, its official Global Times newspaper Nov 23 cited Chinese experts as dismissing what it called “the defiant move” as a misstep on New Delhi's behalf. "Such a move aims to add chips to the upcoming China-India talks on border disputes," it quoted Wang Dehua, an expert on India at the Shanghai International Studies Center, as saying.  It seems that "those hawkish groups in New Delhi are getting above themselves after the US voiced support for India's bid to become a permanent member of the UN Security Council," Wang was further quoted as saying.  It also cited Sun Shihai, an expert on Asia Pacific studies at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, as saying, "By making such a move, India showed its unwillingness to make a concession during the demarcation talks."  China and India are to hold the 14th meeting between their special representatives on border issues on Nov 29-30. China’s official Xinhua news agency recalled that the two countries had designated special representatives for demarcation work in 2003 and signed a political guideline on demarcation during Premier Wen Jiabao's visit to India in 2005.Their last meeting was held last year in New Delhi, with the two sides agreeing to push forward the framework of the talk process and to make common efforts to keep peace and calm in their border areas.

http://www.tibetanreview.net/news.php?cat=10&&id=7777
India to deploy 36,000 extra troops on China border INDIA has formed two new army divisions - comprising more than 36,000 men - to defend the north-eastern state of Arunachal Pradesh, reported BBC on Tuesday. The remote north-eastern state adjoins China which claims large parts of it. The 56th Division will be based in the nearby state of Nagaland to guard the eastern flank of Arunachal Pradesh from Chinese attack through Burma. The other new formation, the 71st Division, will be based in Assam to protect central Arunachal Pradesh. There has been no response so far from China to the decision. Already the Indian Fifth Mountain Division guards western Arunachal Pradesh while another division is responsible for protecting the eastern part of the state. In addition there are counter-insurgency troops in Assam who can be sent to the Sino-Indian border at short notice. A total of 1,260 officers and 35,011 soldiers have been assigned to the two new divisions, which are being especially equipped for mountain warfare. Officials say they were formed at the behest of the Indian army chief, General VK Singh - who said they were necessary to beef up defences against China. Gen Singh was not available for comment but one of his staff officers, on condition of anonymity, told the BBC that the army chief had “pushed very hard to fast-track the raising of the two divisions”. He said that they should be “fully operational” by March 2011.  He said their formation was India’s response to the “huge Chinese build-up” in Tibet over the last three to four years. But he did not wish to elaborate. India is also raising a paramilitary force called the Arunachal Scouts and Sikkim Scouts to help the army protect the Sino-Indian border in the states of Arunachal Pradesh and Sikkim. “All the men in these formations will be drawn from mountain-fit local tribesmen but the officers will be from the army, at least for a while,” said a corps comma-nder. Their formation will be modelled on the Ladakh Scouts, who the army says bravely fought Pakistani intruders during the Kargil conflict of 1999.  India says the new measures have been put in place partly because China has “superb” communications on its side of the border, especially after a new train line to Lhasa was built in 2006. India says that the Chinese airlift capability is also far superior. The formation of the two new divisions means that India’s deployments in the eastern sector of its border with China now matches the five army divisions that existed in 1986-87, when the two countries nearly went to war.  But after India and China signed a “Peace and Tranquillity” treaty in 1993, both sides scaled down their deployments as part of a confidence-building package.

http://www.defence.pk/forums/china-defence/81720-india-deploy-36-000-extra-troops-china-border.html


 

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