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Saturday, 26 January 2013

From Today's Papers - 26 January 2013





Four Years of Anti-Piracy Mission: Chinese Navy’s Showcase Achievement
<![if !supportLists]>-           <![endif]>Kamlesh K Agnihotri*
<![if !supportLists]>-           <![endif]>January 22, 2013
The Chinese Navy celebrated the fourth anniversary of its ongoing anti-piracy escort mission and patrols in the Gulf of Aden and waters off the Somali coast on December 26, 2012 with great fanfare and wide publicity. The three Peoples’ Liberation Army (PLA) Naval Fleets held open day activities over two days from December 25, 2012, onboard some of the ships which have participated in the escort missions. The ships, in particular the Qingdao, Guangzhou and Shenzhen guided missile destroyers and the Zhoushan guided missile frigate proceeded to the ports of the cities after which they are named, and were made open to public. The Chinese media reported the event with great zeal and estimated that more than by 8,000 people from all sections of the society visited these ships.

It was exactly on this day in 2008 that the first ever Chinese naval escort taskforce sailed from Sanya naval facility of Hainan province towards those waters, about 4,400 nautical miles away. The task force comprising Wuhan and Haikou missile destroyers and the Weishan Hu replenishment ship recorded their names in the modern Chinese ‘Defense Forces’ history by embarking on this path-breaking endeavour and remained on task for more than three months till mid-April 2009. This inaugural Chinese naval foray into the distant North Arabian Sea was duly backed up by the ‘Military Operations Other Than War’ (MOOTW) articulation, which appeared for the first time in  the Chinese  ‘National Defense White Paper of 2008’ released soon after, on January 20, 2009.

The PLA Navy possibly, has the reasons to celebrate this achievement; having maintained an uninterrupted and successful deployment of three warships till date. The 13th task force comprising two frigates (Huangshan and Hengyang) and the Qinghaihu replenishment ship, is presently on task since mid-November 2012. Given their propensity of highlighting even minor details related to their achievements, the Chinese let it be known that a total of 34 warships, 28 helicopters and 10,000-odd personnel had participated in these missions till date. To term their continuous presence despite the visible tyranny of distance as ‘meaningful’ would definitely be an understatement; particularly when Beijing claims that its naval task forces have cumulatively accomplished more than 500-plus escort missions for 5,000-odd Chinese and foreign merchant ships, and successfully rescued/salvaged over 60 ships.
Comprehensive gains for the PLA Navy
It is posited that ‘meaningfulness’ of this PLA naval endeavour should be seen in much wider context than mere escorting of merchant ships. The global community would do well to  keep sight of the fact that the PLA Navy had very limited experience of operating in ‘Distant seas’ – as the Chinese Defense White Paper of 2008 termed it – prior to China having embarked on this mission. Their exposure to operations in a multi-national maritime environment, like that prevalent in the Gulf of Aden area, was even more minimal. With that kind of ‘take-off’ level, the advantages that accrued to the PLA Navy from this mission, have simply been tremendous. 
Three of these gains readily come to mind. Firstly, the PLA Navy has been able to practically enhance the effectiveness of its frontline ships in the non-traditional maritime security operations by imbibing the best practices followed by other countries operating in the area. Secondly, the PLA Navy has consistently tested and showcased the capabilities of its latest indigenous ships and integral equipment to the world at large and has signaled by implication, its willingness to operate synergistically with the ships of US, NATO, EU and other countries. Third and the most important aspect has been the priceless experience gained by a large number of naval personnel engaged in various roles as part of these missions. The sturdy ‘sea legs’ acquired over long duration ‘out of area’ maritime deployment; jointmanship learnt by operating with multinational forces; and repeated and intensive exposure to deck based helicopter operations and ‘special forces tasks’ are some of the specific takeaways.
China has in addition, undertaken many maritime and diplomatic activities which are either associated with or complement the presence of its ships in the Gulf of Aden. The PLA Navy ships while on deployment have continually and consistently visited ports in Oman, UAE, Yemen and Djibouti, either for operational turnaround, rest and recreation or to escape bad weather. These ships have increased their inter-operability by jointly operating with other countries’ ships, conducting joint exercises, and exchanging visits of Task Force Commanders and other personnel. For instance, the Chinese task forces’ Commanders have regularly been hosting/calling-on their respective counterparts from the NATO, EU and Combined Task Force 151 at sea. 

Warships of different task forces have also been ‘showing flag’ in various IOR littorals including India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Malaysia, while proceeding to or returning from anti-piracy missions. The PLA Navy’s post deployment arena has progressively expanded, as its escort mission has endured with time. Ships of the 11th task force in fact, crossed the Suez into the Mediterranean and ventured into the Black sea for the first time ever, making maiden visits to Ukrainian, Bulgarian and Romanian ports. These ships subsequently docked at Istanbul and the Israeli port of Haifa, thus remaining in a potentially volatile area on account of ongoing Syrian turmoil and Israel-Lebanon stand-off for close to a month in July-August 2012. The warships of the homeward bound 12th task force have reached out even farther, by routing themselves via Australia. The emergent pattern even on perfunctory analysis resembles a wheel, with the hub at the Gulf of Aden and the spokes fanning out in all directions of the Globe. In the same context, the following additional activities of the PLA Navy also bear a mention:-
<![if !supportLists]>-        <![endif]>PLA Navy hospital ship ‘Peace Ark’ which sailed across the Indian Ocean on ‘Mission Harmony’ during September-November 2010 and visited Djibouti, Kenya, Tanzania, Seychelles and Bangladesh, operated in the Gulf of Aden for few days with the sixth task force.
<![if !supportLists]>-        <![endif]>Similarly, PLA Navy training ship Zheng He, while transiting through the Gulf of Aden as part of its ‘round the world’ training mission also effected a rendezvous with the Yantai frigate of the 11th task force on May 17, 2012 and they operated together for a day.
<![if !supportLists]>-        <![endif]>Diversion of Xuzhou frigate from the anti-piracy task to the Libyan coast in end February 2011 to assist in the withdrawal of Chinese citizens from the crisis struck Libya – the first role of this kind for the PLA Navy – is well documented.
<![if !supportLists]>-        <![endif]>The ‘Ma'anshan’ frigate participated in the Pakistan initiated multilateral maritime exercise ‘Aman 2011’ in March 2011 prior to joining the 8th task force in the Gulf of Aden.
Limitations and Challenges
It is not to say that everything related to this Chinese maiden venture has been smooth sailing. Many a debate has arisen, within and without, with regard to different facets of this ongoing mission. The most vocal internal debate about whether China should look for permanent military bases abroad so as to facilitate its overseas activities like the anti-piracy mission was finally put to rest with an official denial of any such plan by Beijing. Some countries whose warships are participating in the anti-piracy activities in the Gulf of Aden, were quite concerned when China in 2010, sought to alter the existing order by proposing to divide and fix the patrol areas of individual ships. Of greater concern to some others, was the prospect of China becoming the co-leader of certain steering mechanism/s in place, thus getting hold of requisite leverage to affect the changes it desired.
The operational efficiency of the PLA Navy as well as its will to act decisively during mission related crisis situations was also under scrutiny; particularly so when the hijacking episode of a Chinese freighter Dexinhai by Somali pirates that occurred in October 2009, virtually ‘under their nose’. The ship was hijacked about 700 nautical miles (NM) from Somalia and arrived off Somali coast after presumably sailing for 72 hours. The Chinese Task Force which was reportedly 1080 NM from the hijack site could have comfortably intercepted the hijacked vessel in 45-54 hours, even if it had proceeded at moderate speed of 20-24 knots. However, the Chinese ships did not pursue this obvious course of action for reasons best known to them. The fact that the ship was released two months later by payment of around 3.5-4 million US Dollar ransom and then escorted till the Sri Lankan coastline by one of the PLA Navy ships, is of no great consequence though the Chinese media reported it as a rescue act by the PLA Navy.
Conclusion
The above limitations and challenges notwithstanding, there is absolutely no doubting the fact that the ongoing anti-piracy mission has accorded the PLA Navy a unique and ‘never before’ opportunity to operationally test and showcase the frontline units of all three Fleets and provide hands-on work-up to the bulk of its manpower on distant area operations, in a theatre which it did not have to create. While these are visible dividends of past four years of sustained effort, the biggest gainers have perhaps, been the internal logistical, administrative and infrastructural set-ups of the PLA, Navy in particular, which have progressively evolved into well coordinated mechanisms for supporting the pre, post and actual deployment activities of the successive task forces.
If China decided to participate in the anti-piracy mission as part of securing its Sea Lines of Communication (SLOCs) on which its growing economy is so dependent; the manifestations, consequences and implications of its naval presence under that role are far wider. Thus it would not be out of place to suggest that the current deployment meets the ‘need for a growing power to increasingly find larger operating space and strive for presence in all global hotspots, so as to be able to influence events in favour of its own national interest’, to a certain extent. By that supposition, the Chinese Navy is here to stay for a long time to come piracy or no piracy.



Agni-V, Gorshkov to be part of R-Day Parade
Tribune News Service

New Delhi, January 25
Long-range ballistic missile Agni-V will be on display at the Republic Day Parade here tomorrow. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh will arrive at the Rajpath around 9.30 am while the display of military equipment and cultural diversity will commence around 10 am.

The parade this year will focus on nation’s achievements in fields of science, technology and military, besides displaying the culture and works of 19 states and central ministries.

Bhutan King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuk will be the chief guest.

Agni-V, which was successfully tested in April 2012, has a range of 5,000 km. The missile can be launched from anywhere within a few minutes from a self-contained road mobile launcher.

A mini version of INS Vikramaditya (Admiral Gorshkov), which will join the naval fleet by this year-end, is also being showcased. The Navy will also showcase a model of nuclear-powered submarine INS Chakra leased from Russia.

The weaponry put on display by the Indian Army includes the Arjun tanks, cruise missile BrahMos, Pinaka multi-barrel rocket and advanced light helicopter Dhruv.

The Indian Air Force will showcase its latest acquisitions, including models of basic trainer aircraft, the Pilatus PC-7 II, and Augusta Westland AW-101 helicopters, on its tableau.

It will also showcase the indigenous ‘eyes in the sky’ atop the Embraer 145.

359 to be awarded for gallantry
Tribune News Service

New Delhi, January 25
President Pranab Mukherjee has approved awarding of 359 gallantry and other defence decorations to armed forces personnel on the eve of Republic Day. This includes 1 Kirti Chakra, 11 Shaurya Chakras, 56 Sena Medals (Gallantry), one Bar to Nao Sena Medal (Gallantry), three Nao Sena Medals (Gallantry), three Vayu Sena Medals (Gallantry), 28 Param Vishisht Seva Medals, three Uttam Yudh Seva Medals, six Bar to Ati Vishisht Seva Medals, 44 Ati Vishisht Seva Medals, 12 Yudh Seva Medals, two Bar to Sena Medals (Devotion to Duty), 37 Sena Medals (Devotion to Duty), one Bar to Nao Sena Medals (Devotion to Duty), seven Nao Sena Medals (Devotion to Duty), 14 Vayu Sena Medals (Devotion to Duty), four Bar to Vishisht Seva Medals and 116 Vishisht Seva Medals.

Ten Mention-In-Despatches have also been announced. Apart from this, 874 police personnel will be awarded police medals. This includes one President’s Police Medal for gallantry (PPMG), 115 Police Medals for Gallantry (PMG), 88 President’s Police Medals for Distinguished Service and 671 Police Medals for Meritorious Service. Another 37 personnel have got Correctional Service Medals.

The winner of the lone Kirti Chakra is Major Anup Joseph Manjali.

The Shaurya Chakra winners are Major Sandeep Kumar 13th Sikh, Major Manish Punj Rajput, Capt Dinesh Kumar 9 Madras, Lt Manish Singh 9 Para, Subedar Pradeep Beck Bihar and Havildar Vir Singh 13th Sikh. A Rahul Ramesh Engineers, Naik Rajeshwar Singh 16 Punjab, Naik Anil Ail Kumar 16 Punjab and Naik Krishan Kumar Guards have got Shaurya Chakra posthumously. Nav

Awards for Central armed police forces men
CRPF men get 32 Police Medals for Gallantry; Bihar, Maharashtra Police get 12 each
Tribune News Service

New Delhi, January 25
The Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) has been awarded 32 Police Medals for Gallantry, which is the highest amongst all police forces in India. The Bihar Police and the Maharashtra Police rank second with 12 Police Medals for Gallantry each.

The CRPF has been awarded a total of 95 medals, including six President's Police Medals for Distinguished Service, 57 Police Medals for Meritorious Service and 32 Police Medals for Gallantry.

One of the awardees of the Police Medal for Gallantry is late N Manoranjan Singh, who was an Assistant Commandant posted with the 201 CoBRA (Commando Battalion for Resolute Action) battalion. He was killed in a Naxalite ambush at Dantewada in Chhattisgarh.

Border Security Force (BSF) personnel have got 52 medals, including a Police Medal for Gallantry, five President's Police Medals for Distinguished Service and 46 Police Medals for Meritorious Service.

Constable Xavier Kindo has got Police Medal for Gallantry posthumously. Inspector General (Administration) Ashok Kumar, former IG (Ops) Sanjay Kundu, IG (Dr) Surendra Kumar Sharma, Chief Veterinary Officer (SG) Sardari Lal and Assistant Commandant Murad Khan have been chosen for the President's Police Medals for Distinguished Service.

DIG Rajendra Prakash Sanwal and DIG Parshotam S Dhiman among the 46 BSF personnel who have been awarded the Police Medal for Meritorious Service.

SK Gautam, IG (Personal & Training) at the Sashastra Seema Bal headquarters in Delhi was conferred the President’s Police Medal for Distinguished Service.

Eleven other officers and personnel of the SSB have been awarded the Indian Police Medal for Meritorious Service. They include Commandant RS Negi, Deputy Commandant NK Tamta and Assistant Commandant PS Raghawan.

Thirty Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) personnel have been awarded the President's Police Medals. IG (WS HQ), Mumbai, Pramod Shripad Phalnikar, and Commandant (EZ HQ), Patna, Virendra Prasad Bhatt, have been conferred the President's Police Medal for Distinguished Service.

Twenty-five CISF personnel have been awarded the Police Medal for Meritorious Service. They include Sudhir Kumar, DIG (CISF HQ) in New Delhi, Ramesh Chander Huria, DIG (CISF HQ) in New Delhi, and Keshav Kishore Singh, Additional Inspector General (CISF HQ) in New Delhi.

Three CISF personnel have been awarded the Fire Service Medal for Meritorious Service. Assistant Commandant (DSP Durgapur) Dhyan Singh is one of the awardees for this medal.

Three Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP) personnel have been awarded the President Police Medal for Distinguished Service. Twelve ITBP officers have been conferred the Police Medal for Meritorious Service.

PVSM for Air Marshal Rajinder Singh
Tribune News Service
Bangalore, January 25
Palampur-born Air Marshal Rajinder Singh, Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Headquarters Training Command, IAF, Bangalore, has been awarded the Param Vishisht Seva Medal (PVSM) for distinguished and meritorious service of the most exceptional order.

Air Marshal Rajinder Singh was commissioned in the flying branch on December 14, 1974. He is Qualified Flying Instructor and has flown over 3,100 hours
on Hunter, Marut, Kiran and all variants of MiG aircraft during his career spanning four decades.

The Air Marshal has commanded a frontline fighter squadron besides holding prestigious appointments of Air Officer Commanding, Air Force Station, Palam, and Defence Attache at Embassy of India, Egypt, where he looked after five countries.

The Air Marshal is also the recipient of the Ati Vishisht Seva Medal and Vayu Sena Medal. 

India to test subsonic cruise missile in February
BANGALORE: India will flight test its "Nirbhay (fearless)" subsonic cruise missile in February from the integrated test range at Chandipur in Odisha on the east coast, a top defence official said Friday.

"The medium range sub-sonic cruise missile Nirbhay is at the final state of integration and we hope to launch it next month to flight test its capabilities, including stealth and accuracy," scientific advisor to defence minister VK Saraswat told reporters here.

Weighing about one tonne, the six-metre long missile is being integrated with ring-laser gyro-based high accuracy navigation system and a radio altimeter for the height.

Designed and developed by the Aeronautical Development Establishment of the state-run Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) in Bangalore for the Indian armed forces, the cruise missile can be launched from land, sea and air and has a 750 km range.

"The missile has also a good loitering capability, control and guidance with a high degree of accuracy for maximum impact," Saraswat, who is also director-general of DRDO, said at a briefing on the upcoming ninth edition of Aero India 2013 here.

The all-weather cruise missile will be inducted into the Indian navy, army and air force over the next 12-18 months.
"The integration is taking place at our R&D Engineers at Pune for the maiden test next month," a DRDO official said.

Nirbhay will also supplement the Brahmos cruise missile by carrying warheads beyond the 300km range, as it is capable of flying at different altitudes ranging from 500 metres to 4km. With two wings alongside, the missile can also fly at low altitudes to avoid detection by enemy radar.

65 years after Independence, Indian Army, Navy have no permanent headquarters

New Delhi: It's well know that the Indian Army is short of officers, but not so well known is that it doesn't have a permanent headquarters. Practically, everywhere the Army and the Navy sit in Delhi is a temporary accommodation and the situation seems unlikely to improve.

Sixty-five years after Independence, neither service has a permanent headquarters. The Army is short of 5 lakh square feet of space, forcing it to function from seven different locations ranging from Lutyens' Delhi to Timarpur. The Navy does a little better but only because it's smaller.

Everywhere the Army and Navy sit is temporary accommodation dating back to World War II, except Delhi Cantonment. At Sena Bhavan, the Public Works Department is the landlord, in South Block, it's the Urban Development Ministry.
At South Block, the Army and Navy share space with civilian employees of the Defence Ministry. Key departments like intelligence and operations function in a less than secure environment. Office space is squeezed, working conditions are poor.

"The worse thing is efficiency does suffer because we have some parts of one branch in South Block while the other part is in Sena Bhavan, some are in M Block, some in cantonment. So I think something must be done," says Lt Gen Mukesh Sabharwal, ex-AG's branch.

Ideally, the Army would like a headquarters close to the Sena Bhavan, a possible location is across the road where the Canteen services department is located. Army plans envisage a subway linking Sena Bhavan with the new headquarters, but the urban development ministry has offered that site to the Navy presently housed at the INS India barracks and said the army should move to Sena Bhavan after the Navy moves out.

The Army says one headquarter would enable it to consolidate its other offices, besides the Sena Bhavan was built to house the Defence Ministry. As the tug of war goes on, the Air Force now wants to move its chief into South Block, into the offices being vacated by the External Affairs Ministry. The logic is that South Block has prestige even if the accommodation is not your own.

Brinkmanship
The events that followed a series of controversial incidents on the Line of Control beginning on January 6 lead to an obvious conclusion: the ups and downs that the Pakistan-India relations suffer from every now and then stem from deep-rooted bilateral mistrust, if not hatred and dislike within certain segments of the Indian society.

Within a span of 12 days, almost all those who matter in India - from Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to Sushma Sauraj to the army chief inter alia - took umbrage to the incidents on the Line of Control, vowing revenge.
Then came the turnaround. "It is unfortunate that out of context debates take place in the media. But the media is free. You have to take the good and bad of the media if you believe in a free society. But we are not going to be influenced necessarily by jingoistic conversations that take place on some sections of the media," India's External Affairs Minister Salman Khurshid told Karan Thapar on CNN IBN's Devil's Advocate programme (January 20).

Asked if the peace process had been put on hold, the minister said, "I don't think so. I think the peace process is going well. What our indication is, we have got back on track quite a bit. I don't even know to what extent we had gone off track but certainly there was a sense that we were slipping." Only two days earlier, Khurshid had offloaded his anger by describing the alleged beheading of an Indian soldier as "absolutely unacceptable, ghastly, and really, really terrible and extremely short-sighted on their part". He said any response would be "proportionate".

This assessment on January 20 sounded ridiculous and paradoxical to earlier pronouncements. One simply cannot dismiss as a teenager's reckless rhetoric what the Indian civilian and military leaders harped on for several days. It is therefore instructive to revisit what Indian leaders said.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh: "Those responsible for this crime will have to be brought to book. It can't be business as usual."

Sushma Swaraj (opposition leader in Lok Sabha): "If his (Hemraj's) head cannot be brought back, we should get at least 10 heads from their side."

General Bikram Sing (Chief of Army Staff of the Indian Army): "Local commanders have been asked to hit back at the place and timing of their choosing."

Anna Hazare (Social activist): "We should repeat the lesson we gave Pakistan in '65. If they call me back, I'll go and fight Pakistan."

Ram Gopal Yadav (leader of Samajwadi Party): "This issue has not been resolved since '47. The only solution is war. India should go in for war."
Imagine the poison that absolutist, vengeful statements from luminaries can inject into gullible public minds. And this came through clearly when most of the Indian media, the beastly 24/7 channels (not different from their Pakistani counterparts), indulged in "threadbare analysis" provoking the public and triggering a war hysteria.

Fortunately, some sober voices from within India attempted to cool off raging tempers.

"BJP leaders found an ideal opportunity to push their agenda and force the government to take a tough line. A nervous Congress party, busy second-guessing how the opposition would haul it over coals for being soft on Pakistan, itself upped the ante," wrote Amit Baruha, a former correspondent for daily The Hindu in Pakistan, in a report for the Outlook magazine.

Rahul Gandhi reacted with unusual caution. "We should take tough steps but not be emotional in our response," he said as the majority of participants sought strict action against Pakistan during his Congress party's brainstorming conclave in Jaipur titled 'India and the World'. Decisions cannot guided by emotions, Gandhi reportedly told the gathering.

The bombshell that Union Home Minister Sushil Kumar Shinde dropped on the BJP and Rashtria Sevak Sangh (RSS) for conducting terror training camps and promoting "Hindu terrorism also helped in moderating the vitriolic Pakistan-focused debate, and changed its focus.

"On one hand we are trying to bring peace in this country. We are also taking steps against injustice to minorities, as also against infiltration. But, in the midst of all this, we have got an investigation report that be it the RSS or BJP, their training camps are promoting Hindu terrorism," Mr Shinde said at the AICC session here.

Shinde's daring statement sparked an internal controversy, with BJP likening it with an attempt to "disrupting peace and harmony in the country". The BJP also demanded an immediate apology from the Congress leadership but the Congress backed up Shinde, with Salman Khursid insisting institutional documentation supported Shinde's statements on the BJP and RSS support for terrorist groups, which are often called the "saffron brigades".

Congress General Secretary Digvijay Singh said, "It is not Hindu terrorism but Sangh-backed terrorism".

"I am 100 percent with Shinde on this. This isn't a secret. I want to thank the home minister for saying what everyone knows but do not have the courage to say," another party leader Mani Shankar Aiyar said.

Strangely, it resonated with the situation within Pakistan, where most don't dare speak openly about the conduct and views of radical religio-political militants.

The focus on BJP-RSS-sponsored terrorism in India obviously deflected considerable attention from Pakistan but it hardly fazes the Indian preoccupation, particularly of the Indian think-tankers and security officials, with Pakistan's "expanding nuclear and tactical weapons arsenal, Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammad, and the cross-border infiltration".

While the Indian political parties need to explain the major motivation for the "Saffron Brigades", it is incumbent upon the Pakistani leadership to come clean, at least on the militant-terrorism front, and explain as to whether and to what extent the LeT and JeM still constitute an essential part of the foreign policy.

Lastly, bilateral mistrust rules the roost and flows from the cold-war era policies. In this context, Russian scholars recently drew on the Soviet Union-USA analogy to advise both India and Pakistan not to allow mistrust come in the way of a sustained dialogue. The advice resonated at a recent gathering at the Institute of World Economy and International Relations (Imemo), a top-rated Russian think-tank advising the Kremlin. They recalled that despite decades of mistrust, talks eventually bridged the confidence gap between Moscow and Washington. Russian experts also argued that despite the centrality of China to India's nuclear strategy, it is unrealistic to expect Beijing to negotiate with New Delhi, because China's nuclear forces are primarily aimed at countering the threat from the US.

Let us hope India and Pakistan take a cue from their Russian friends and continue talking rather than behaving like brash teenagers who usually are mindless of the impact their stated positions might entail. It is time for mature and restrained conduct.

They might also heed the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of Human Rights Defenders, Margaret Sekaggya, who recently (January 18) advised India to keep politics with Pakistan on the Jammu and Kashmir situation aside and instead take up issues "about the people" and begin the "healing process" as they "have been suffering for many years."

Imtiaz Gul is the executive director of the independent Centre for Research and Security Studies, and the author of the recently released book Pakistan: Before and After Osama, Roli Books, India



LIST OF PERSONNEL BEING AWARDED GALLANTRY / DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS ON THE OCCASION OF REPUBLIC DAY 2013

PARAM VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL
1. IC-25839W LT GEN BALJEET SINGH, VSM, ARTY, (RETIRED)
2. IC-27265N LT GEN BALAKRISHNAN VENUGOPAL NAIR, AVSM, ARTY, DSSC
3. IC-27290M LT GEN RAMESH HALGALI, AVSM, SM, INF
4. IC-27701A LT GEN DALBIR SINGH SIDHU, AVSM, VSM, ARMD (RETIRED)
5. IC-27767W LT GEN PRADEEP BHALLA, AVSM, VSM, AOC (RETIRED)
6. IC-27782L LT GEN PANEMANGALORE GOPALAKRISHNA KAMATH, AVSM, YSM, SM, INF    
7. IC-27972X LT GEN GYAN BHUSHAN, UYSM, AVSM, VSM, INF, HQ WC
8. IC-27979F LT GEN JATINDER SINGH BAJWA, UYSM, SM, INF
9. IC-27990A LT GEN MUNISH SIBAL, AVSM**, INF
10. IC-27994W LT GEN PALVINDER SINGH BHALLA, AVSM, ARMD, HQ NCC
11. IC-30016A LT GEN ANIL CHANDRA CHAIT, AVSM, VSM, ARMD, HQ CC
12. IC-30068W LT GEN SURENDRA PRATAP TANWAR, AVSM, ARTY (RETIRED)
13. IC-30085W LT GEN JAG DARSHAN SINGH RAWAT, SM, INT, MINTSD
14. IC-30118W LT GEN ANJAN MUKHERJEE, AVSM, ARTY
15. IC-30353P LT GEN SYED ATA HASNAIN, UYSM, AVSM, SM, VSM**, INF
16. IC-30516X LT GEN KULDIP SINGH, AVSM, AAD
17. IC-30687K LT GEN SANJIV LANGER, AVSM, ARMD
18. IC-30722F LT GEN VIJAI SHARMA, AVSM, ENGRS
19. MR-03471Y LT GEN GAUTAM RAVINDRANATH, SM, VSM, PHS, AMC


KIRTI CHAKRA
1.      IC-67270F MAJ ANUP JOSEPH MANJALI, BIHAR, RR
UTTAM YUDH SEVA MEDAL
1. IC-30351K LT GEN DALBIR SINGH, AVSM, VSM, INF
2. IC-31052X LT GEN SHAKTI GURUNG, AVSM, VSM, INF
3. IC-36269L LT GEN ANIL SINGH NANDAL, AVSM, SM, INF


BAR TO ATI VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-27325X LT GEN RAJESH KOCHHAR, AVSM, SM, VSM, EME, (RETIRED)
2. IC-27967M LT GEN SURINDER PAL SINGH, AVSM, VSM, ARTY, (RETIRED)
3. IC-30708P LT GEN ASHOK KUMAR CHOUDHARY, AVSM, SM, VSM, INF
4. IC-31324M LT GEN KOTHENETH SURENDRANATH, AVSM, SM, VSM, ARMD

ATI VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL

1. IC-27269K LT GEN SISIR SUBHRA SENGUPTA, VSM, ENGRS (RETIRED)
2. IC-27969X LT GEN RAJESH PANT, VSM, SIGS, MCTE, MHOW
3. IC-30462F LT GEN AMARJEET SINGH CHABBEWAL, YSM, ARMD
4. IC-30702N LT GEN PHILIP CAMPOSE, VSM, MECH INF
5. IC-31007L LT GEN ANIL MALIK, ARMD
6. IC-31341M LT GEN SANJEEV ANAND, VSM, MECH INF
7. IC-31505X LT GEN SUBROTO MITRA, SM, VSM, INF
8. IC-31521P LT GEN SURENDRA HARI KULKARNI, VSM**, ARMD
9. IC-31917Y LT GEN SURINDER MOHAN MEHTA, SM, VSM**, EME
10. MR-03516M LT GEN MANDEEP SINGH, VSM, AMC (RETIRED)
11. MR-04125P LT GEN SURENDRA SINGH PANWAR, SM, AMC
12. DR-10295P LT GEN SWAMINATHAN MURALI MOHAN, AD CORPS
13. IC-30817F MAJ GEN AJAY KUMAR CHATURVEDI, VSM, ENGRS (RETIRED)
14. IC-34086F MAJ GEN BAL KRISHAN SHARMA, SM**, INF (RETIRED)
15. IC-34350Y MAJ GEN KAMAL JIT SINGH, ARMD
16. IC-34385P MAJ GEN ANIL KUMAR AHUJA, SM, VSM**, ARTY
17. IC-34396F MAJ GEN RAVINDRAN NARAYAN NAIR, SM, INF
18. IC-34829N MAJ GEN SANJIV TALWAR, ENGRS
19. IC-35173W MAJ GEN RAYMOND JOSEPH NORONHA, SM, INF
20. IC-35206W MAJ GEN KONSAM HIMALAY SINGH, YSM, INF
21. IC-35471M MAJ GEN BIPIN RAWAT, YSM, SM, VSM, INF
22. IC-35487X MAJ GEN NARINDER PAL SINGH HIRA, SM, INF
23. IC-35626W MAJ GEN UMESH KUMAR GURUNG, YSM, INF
24. IC-37022W MAJ GEN SANJAY KULKARNI, SC, SM, VSM
25. IC-37204K MAJ GEN BINOY POONNEN, VSM, INF
26. MR-03691H MAJ GEN RAJAN CHAUDHRY, VSM, AMC
27. JC-520361A SUB VIJAY KUMAR, SM, DOGRA


SHAURYA CHAKRA


1. IC-65554M MAJ SANDEEP KUMAR, SIKH
2. IC-65672A MAJ MANISH PUNJ, RAJPUT
3. IC-68806Y CAPT A RAHUL RAMESH, ENGRS (POSTHUMOUS)
4. IC-72070P CAPT DINESH KUMAR,  MADRAS
5. IC-74882F LT MANISH SINGH, PARA (SF)
6. JC-559638M SUB PRADEEP BECK, BIHAR
7. 3398295W HAV VIR SINGH, SIKH
8. 2486356P NK RAJESHVER SINGH,  PUNJAB (POSTHUMOUS)
9. 2486445N NK ANIL KUMAR,  PUNJAB (POSTHUMOUS)
10. 13698975M NK KRISHAN KUMAR, GUARDS,SIKH LI BN GP (POSTHUMOUS)


YUDH SEVA MEDAL


1. IC-38796L BRIG SUNIL YADAV, JAK RIF
2. IC-41521H BRIG HARSHA GUPTA, SIKH LI
3. IC-41672F BRIG SANJEEV KUMAR SHARMA, RAJ RIF
4. IC-41885P BRIG U SURESH KUMAR, VSM, PUNJAB
5. IC-41927W BRIG SHIVENDER SINGH, GARH RIF
6. IC-42278H BRIG BIJOY DHOJ RAI, PARA
7. IC-42389A BRIG RAJU BAGGAVALLI SOMASHEKAR, JAT
8. IC-42491H BRIG CHANDI PRASAD SANGRA, MARATHA LI
9. IC-45244A BRIG SANJAY KUMAR RAO, SIKH
10. IC-50623A COL CK RAJESH, SM**, GUARDS
11. IC-54023P COL SANJIV MEHROTRA, SIKH LI
12. IC-55474F COL MOHIT KHOKHRAN,  SIKH


SENA MEDAL (GALLANTRY)


1. IC-53687W COL VIKRANT AVINASH DESAI, PUNJAB
2. IC-54879A COL DEEPAK SAJJANHAR, NAGA
3. IC-55340H COL LALIT SHARMA, SC,  GRENADIERS
4. IC-58485Y LT COL DEEPAK SINGH SAMANT, KUMAON
5. IC-60642Y MAJ DHIRENDER YADAV, ARMY AVN
6. IC-60861A MAJ GAURAV DOGRA, RAJPUT
7. IC-60879W MAJ SUNIL DAGAR, ARMY AVN
8. IC-61856F MAJ SOMBIR SINGH LAMBA, ASC
9. IC-62531A MAJ SAPAM ZENET, ASC
10. IC-62588P MAJ SANDEEP SHARMA, SIKH
11. IC-62680N MAJ SADEEP KHAWAS, ARTY
12. IC-62920A MAJ ABHISHEK KUKRETI, ENGRS
13. IC-63103N MAJ SUHEL SINGH SALARIA,  SIKH
14. IC-63403P MAJ BHEEMAIAH PS, PARA (SF)
15. IC-63811A MAJ DARA SINGH CHAHAL, GRENADIERS
16. IC-63876N MAJ NAWAJESH N PATEL, PARA (SF)
17. IC-63939L MAJ VINOD KUMAR, ASC
18. IC-64883W MAJ RAJEEV KUMAR,  MARATHA LI
19. IC-65610A MAJ AJAY KUMAR, SIKH
20. IC-66883P MAJ YOGESHWAR SINGH,  PARA (SF)
21. IC-67625F MAJ SANJEEV SINGH, MECH INF
22. IC-67745A MAJ ASHWINI KUMAR DIXIT, ENGRS
23. IC-68162K MAJ ASHISH SRIVASTAVA, SIKH
24. IC-69283X MAJ SONU K SIDHARTHAN, ARTY
25. IC-70460Y MAJ ARJUN KUMAR BUTOLA, MARATHA LI
26. IC-70643P MAJ AMAL SALI,  NAGA
27. IC-72852L MAJ PRATEEK MALIK, ARMD
28. IC-72889M MAJ SWAGAT SHARMA, ARMD
29. SS-40378P MAJ SALIM KHAN, SIKH
30. IC-71529K CAPT VISHWAKARMA SUDHANSHU JAGANNATH, SIKH LI
31. IC-74999A CAPT V ARUL,  GRENADIERS
32. SS-43019M CAPT AYANANGSHU HAZRA,  MADRAS
33. IC-72254N LT AJAY SINGH PATHANIA, ASC
34. IC-75156Y LT MOHIT JATAIN, EME
35. SS-44395M LT NIRAV PATHANIA, AOC
36. AR-355 ASST COMDT RAJ KISHOR,  ASSAM RIF
37. JC-439956A SUB GNANASEKHAR REDDY,  MADRAS
38. 3995986P HAV KARAM CHAND THAKUR, PARA (SF)
39. 4087917K HAV RAGHUVEER CHAND, GARH RIF
40. 4273971W HAV ARBIND KUMAR, BIHAR
41. 14434471K HAV RAJNISH KUMAR, ARTY
42. 2689299N L/HAV HARVINDER SINGH, GRENADIERS (POSTHUMOUS)
43. G/104947F L/HAV L KAMINI SINGH, ASSAM RIF
44. 2798125K L/NK PATIL LAKSHMAN NAMDEO,  MARATHA LI
45. 3404348H L/NK KULWINDER SINGH,  SIKH
46. 4479157L L/NK DALJIT SINGH,  SIKH LI
47. 13623707F L/NK SREEKESH SUKUMARAN,  MADRAS
48. 13763846H L/NK AJAY KUMAR THAPA, JAK RIF
49. 3406917K SEP CHANAN SINGH,  SIKH
50. 4574805N SEP SANDEEP, MAHAR (POSTHUMOUS)
51. 14704478X SEP FRANCIS WOPEN J HUMTSOE,  NAGA
52. 4091577K RFN CHANDAR SINGH, GARH RIF (POSTHUMOUS)
53. 16016556W RFN GIRDHARI RAM, RAJ RIF
54. G/5003953H RFN SOROKHAIBAM SHANTI KUMAR,  ASSAM RIF
55. 2703367K GDR RANJEET SINGH YADAV, GRENADIERS
56. 14440737F GNR GOPAL, ARTY
 
BAR TO SENA MEDAL (DISTINGUISHED)

1. IC-35499M MAJ GEN MADINANI RAMESH BABU, SM, INF
2. IC-54082F COL VIKRAM SINGH GULERIA, SM, RAJPUT


SENA MEDAL (DISTINGUISHED)


1. IC-31634X MAJ GEN RAVINDRA SINGH PANWAR, VSM, SIGS
2. IC-35109Y MAJ GEN RAJEEV VASANT KANITKAR, ARMD
3. IC-35110N MAJ GEN VENUGOPAL MENON, VSM, ENGRS
4. IC-41089M BRIG RAMESH KUMAR RAINA, GARH RIF
5. IC-41136Y BRIG BALRAJ MEHTA, BIHAR
6. IC-41522L BRIG ANANTA BHUYAN, KUMAON
7. IC-41668Y BRIG ASHIM KOHLI, ARTY
8. IC-41906A BRIG SANJAY RAI, BIHAR
9. IC-42004X BRIG RANA PRATAP KALITA, VSM, KUMAON
10. IC-42270W BRIG KAMAL KUMAR REPSWAL, ENGRS
11. IC-42538H BRIG ATULYA SOLANKEY, GORKHA RIF
12. IC-45006N BRIG ASHUTOSH SIROTHIA, MADRAS
13. IC-45297Y BRIG SHAMMI RAJ, ARTY
14. IC-50610H COL ATUL KUMAR, ARTY
15. IC-52370P COL RAJEEV NAGYAL,  GORKHA RIF
16. IC-52483X COL KISHAN MOHAN AGARWAL, ENGRS REGT
17. IC-52513K COL VIKRAM SINGH PATHANIA,  JAK RIF
18. IC-52757X COL SUDHANSHU SHARMA, GORKHA RIF
19. IC-53133X COL AMARESH GUNJAN,  GARH RIF
20. IC-53209M COL NARINDER SINGH,  RAJ RIF
21. IC-53723W COL RAMAN SHARMA, RAJ RIF
22. IC-53832H COL MANISH SHARMA,  RAJ RIF
23. IC-53934Y COL YASHDEEP SANGWAN,  MADRAS
24. IC-54048F COL NARESH KUMAR BHAGASRA,  DOGRA
25. IC-54430X COL RAJ KUMAR,  DOGRA
26. IC-54512A COL BIKRAM SAINI, PUNJAB
27. IC-55127H COL ARMARDEEP SINGH BALI,  SIKH LI
28. IC-55141P COL SANJEEV KUMAR,  PUNJAB
29. IC-55143A COL PARAM JEET SINGH, JAT
30. IC-50975X LT COL RAM NIWAS, GUARDS, ORD FACTORY
31. IC-55461K LT COL DHANANJAY M BHOSALE,  ARMY AVN SQN (UH)
32. IC-55473Y LT COL RAJESH KUMAR SHUKLA, SIKH LI
33. IC-61019P MAJ ATUL KUMAR SHARMA,  GORKHA RIF
34. IC-62147Y MAJ VASUDEVAN, DOGRA
35. IC-66846F MAJ PRADEEP SINGH RATHORE, ARMY AVN
36. 15670318Y NK BHASKAR DEURI, SIGS
37. 4080082X L/NK ARUN KUMAR, GARH RIF


BAR TO VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL


1. IC-34648H MAJ GEN SURESH CHANDRA JAIN, VSM, EME, (RETIRED)
2. IC-35479Y MAJ GEN BALWANT SINGH NEGI, YSM, SM, VSM, INF
3. IC-36905N MAJ GEN MELACHEVEL SRINIVASAN SANTHANA KRISHNAN, VSM, AOC (RETIRED)
4. IC-41464M BRIG TEJPAL SINGH RAWAT, VSM, ENGRS


VISHISHT SEVA MEDAL


1. IC-31642W MAJ GEN NRUSINGHA PRASAD PADHI, ENGRS
2. IC-34014M MAJ GEN AMIT SHARMA, ARMD
3. IC-34338X MAJ GEN GURDARSHAN SINGH SHERGILL, INF
4. IC-34436X MAJ GEN KHURSHED MANECK BALSARA, SM, INF
5. IC-34708M MAJ GEN GOPAL SINGH BISHT, SIGS
6. IC-34760P MAJ GEN PRAVEEN BAKSHI, ARMD
7. IC-35115M MAJ GEN JAGBIR SINGH, MECH INF
8. IC-35201X MAJ GEN AJAI KUMAR SAHGAL, AAD
9. IC-35307K MAJ GEN VELAYUDHAN NAIR PRASAD, SM, INF
10. IC-35481W MAJ GEN RAJIV NARAYANAN, ARMD
11. IC-35515Y MAJ GEN BHABANI S DAS, SM, INF
12. IC-35586A MAJ GEN BHUPINDER SINGH SAROYA, MECH INF
13. IC-35610L MAJ GEN BALBIR SINGH, ASC
14. IC-35650M MAJ GEN BOBBY CHERIAN MATHEWS, INF
15. IC-36786H MAJ GEN GURCHARAN SINGH LAMBA, SIGS
16. IC-36913M MAJ GEN LALIT KUMAR RAMPAL, INF
17. IC-37297K MAJ GEN RATTAN KUMAR MATTU, ENGRS
18. IC-38621H MAJ GEN PRADYOT KUMAR MALLICK, SIGS
19. MR-03592A MAJ GEN BHIM SINGH VERMA, AMC
20. IC-35923K BRIG JAGBIR SINGH CHEEMA, SIKH,
21. IC-37977K BRIG UMAR FAROOK A, SIGS
22. IC-39076W BRIG PRAVEEN DIXIT, ARMD
23. IC-39180K BRIG RAJIV MISHRA, ARTY
24. IC-39457X BRIG MOHAN DEEP SINGH GHURA, RAJ RIF
25. IC-40366A BRIG ANAND SINGH RAWAT, SM, SIKH LI
26. IC-40395P BRIG NIETZSCHE BALAN, MAHAR
27. IC-40824L BRIG AJAY SETH, GARH RIF
28. IC-41072Y BRIG RAJEEV SIROHI, GRENADIERS
29. IC-41235F BRIG SANJEEV SAINI, GORKHA RIFLES
30. IC-41478M BRIG SHAILESH SADASHIV TINAIKAR, SM, PARA
31. IC-41488W BRIG RAJEEV CHAUDHRY, ENGRS
32. IC-41566H BRIG VIVEK KRISHAN SINGH, ARMD
33. IC-41860L BRIG SHANTANU DAYAL, GARH RIF
34. IC-41914Y BRIG PRITAM BISHNOI, SIGS
35. IC-42288M BRIG ANIL PURI, ENGRS
36. IC-42400N BRIG TUMUL VARMA, EME
37. IC-42485P BRIG RAJ SINHA,  GORKHA RIF (FF)
38. IC-42516K BRIG OM PRAKASH GULIA, SM, BIHAR
39. IC-42552P BRIG SARVAJIT SINGH, ENGRS
40. IC-43169H BRIG MAHENDER SINGH, ENGRS
41. IC-45126M BRIG NARENDER KUMAR, SM, MADRAS
42. IC-45175P BRIG RANDHIR SINGH, MECH INF
43. IC-45191M BRIG RAJENDER SINGH SHEKHAWAT, SM, RAJ RIF
44. MR-04139P BRIG MADDUR DORAISWAMY IYENGAR VENKATESH, AMC, DGAFMS
45. MR-04758H BRIG DARSHAN SINGH BHAKUNI, AMC
46. SL-03159W BRIG JASBIR SINGH JASWAL, GEN SERVICE
47. IC-41977F COL DHARAMVEER SINGH SUHAG,  GORKHA RIF
48. IC-43842Y COL MANIK KUMAR DAS, SM**, JAK LI
49. IC-44057P COL RAJIV MANKOTIA, GORKHA RIF
50. IC-46002K COL PRAVEEN KUMAR, SM, JAG'S DEPTT
51. IC-47047W COL JAI SINGH YADAV, DOGRA
52. IC-47718P COL JAIVEER SINGH SARAN, MADRAS
53. IC-48061P COL SUDHANWA ATRE, PARA
54. IC-49286K COL ANURAAG CHHIBBER, GUARDS
55. IC-51018Y COL UMAID SINGH RATHORE, ARMY AVN SQN (R&O)
56. IC-51957F COL VIVEK SINGH, ENGR REGT
57. IC-53582M COL CHANDAN SINGH PATHANIA,  MAHAR
58. IC-53596M COL DEEPAK SHARMA, KUMAON
59. IC-54894P COL SUNIL DUTT UPADHYAY, ARTY
60. IC-54995H COL CHANDER SHEKHAR BHATTI,  GRENADIERS
61. MR-05065X COL RANJIT SINGH BAWA, AMC
62. IC-62115W MAJ RANVEER SINGH JAMWAL, JAT
63. MR-08413Y MAJ NEIKHRIETUONUO LINYU, AMC
64. WS-00688X MAJ NEHA BHATNAGAR, ENGRS
65. SS-44235M CAPT SMITHA L, SIGS
66. WS-01363W CAPT NAMRATA RATHORE, ENGRS
67. WS-01369X CAPT POONAM SANGWAN, AOC
68. WS-01399P CAPT PRACHI R GOLE, AOC
69. WS-01474N CAPT DEEPIKA RATHORE, AOC
70. JC-530339L SUB TAJPAL SINGH, SM, GARHWAL RIF
71. JC-539371F SUB RAJENDRA SINGH JALAL, KUMAON
72. 15185213A HAV LAISHRAM DEVENDRO SINGH, ARTY


MENTION-IN-DESPATCHES


OPERATION RAKSHAK


1. IC-57161F LT COL GURDEEP SINGH, ARMY AVN SQN (R&O)
2. IC-59307H MAJ SANDEEP SINGH AULUKH, ARMY AVN SQN (R&O)
3. IC-66181W MAJ RAKESH YADAV, SM, PARA
4. JC-379695L NB SUB NARESH KUMAR, SIGS
5. JC-404690A NB SUB RAMESH KUMAR, GUARDS
6. 15716416A SIGMN VAISHNO VEER SINGH, SIGS
OPERATION RHINO
1 IC-62350P MAJ NAVDEEP KUMAR MALHOTRA, MADRAS
2 IC-72710N CAPT DINESH KUMAR YADAV, EME, SIKH LI
3 SS-42732X CAPT ARUN GEORGE ABRAHAM, GARHWAL RIF
4 4082382X L/NK RANVEER SINGH GUSAIN, GARHWAL RIF



* Commander Kamlesh K Agnihotri is a Research Fellow with the China Cell of the National Maritime Foundation, New Delhi. The views expressed are solely those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Indian Navy or the National Maritime Foundation. The author can be reached at kkagnihotri@maritimeindia.org

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